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How Long Do Running Shoes Last?shoe mileage question


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#1 bonechina

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Posted 27 July 2007 - 02:59 PM

Hi All,

I weigh 72 kg, and have really flat feet and overpronate like crazy. I mostly run on asphalt, dirt paths etc...

The reason I asked this questions is because off late i have been suffering from recurring shin splints and was wondering whether my shoes, 2 pairs of Asics GT 2100, one with 250 miles and the other with 224 miles, were responsible for it. I had the Kayano XI for sometime and retired them at 289 miles.

Do other brands fare better?

Does anyone count their walking miles, ie miles used for warming up and cooling down as part of the overall shoe mileage?

Edited by bonechina, 27 July 2007 - 03:00 PM.


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#2 Jogger

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Posted 27 July 2007 - 03:14 PM

Mine don't do any miles, but lots of Kms !!!!!!!!!

250miles is approx 400km - this is at the lower end of the scale.
I think an average shoe should do 400-800km.
Less than 400km and I reckon you are wearing the wrong shoe.
More than 800km is good, more than 1000km is great.
My last pair did 1200km.

Brands are brands are brands, they are pretty much all made in the same places.
Asics are a good shoe - rather than blame them I would look at what is the RIGHT SHOE FOR YOU.

#3 Sunset

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Posted 27 July 2007 - 03:29 PM

My Mizuno's are at about 580km at the moment. A podiatrist and physio looked at them the other day and said they look fine.

I'm wondering when I should replace them? I'm not going to wait for wear/tear (as my last pair was still structually sound but the cushioning was shot), and I don't want to wait for injuries to creep in.

Therefore I want to have a X number of kilometres where I will replace them.

I was thinking at 1000km but perhaps I should do it before that? 800km you think?

Edited by Sunset, 27 July 2007 - 03:30 PM.


#4 Jogger

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Posted 27 July 2007 - 03:37 PM

sunset if you counted the kms on the last pair, you could just stop 50-100km beforehand.
If they were a different model then you can't really do that as you would get wear changes between models - what you need is a model of shoe that doesn't change for 5 years so you can predict it .....

#5 tim

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Posted 27 July 2007 - 03:49 PM

I know the air sole on the Pegasus goes after about 800km. You can still run in them but they squeak.

I do not keep track of mileage or when I buy my shoes so it more a feeling I get when I look to the west, And my spirit is crying for new shoes.

that and my legs feel more tired than usual.

#6 milov

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Posted 27 July 2007 - 05:07 PM

I currently have six pairs of useable road shoes and five pairs of racing flats. I rotate the shoes giving them more time to recover. If a pair of shoes gets used once a week instead of once a day then you get a far greater life expentency from them.

#7 walshy2

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Posted 27 July 2007 - 08:23 PM

i think avg would be around 800km. Im not disciplined enough to keep track and so err on the safe side and go for a new pair more regularly than I probably need to.
I also agree with one of the previous threads re not just having 1 pair. Currently I rotate between 3 models of the Asics Nimbus plus a set of DS trainers. gives them a chance to recover on their days off haha

#8 seris

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Posted 27 July 2007 - 11:26 PM

Surely it depends on how heavy you are, foot strike etc... etc. I have a pair of shoes (the Max Moto Nike) that I only run my marathons in ( so 7 x 42kms since Oct 2006 and still look new) I train in Asics and Nikes (probably have 4 pairs). I will bet you that any of my runners are fine after 1,000kms. I have been lucky to be injury free after 35 marathons. If I change my shoes it is because they LOOK worn...... if my knees hurt or I had injuries, maybe I would hope it was my shoes and not my body! I don't change my toothbrush if I get a cavity, I change it when it looks too awful to sit on the bathroom sink.

#9 DECIM8

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Posted 28 July 2007 - 09:31 AM

Just a tip, the 2100 series shoe is about 2.5 years old already which means the midsole will degrade faster than a normal "new" shoe.

Being you are only 75kg I would expect that the age of the shoe (bare in mind this is not about when you bought it) is your problem.

A typical "sign" is deep cracking in the midsole of most runners. And for people who use supportive shoes you can often see the midsole colapse on the lateral side so you tend to start rolling out (increased with orthosies)

And yes walking is also included in your mileage because walking involves 2-3 times your body weight and will also compress the shoe, I work in store all day and often run in the same shoes. 3 months until I swap shoes.

Edited by DECIM8, 28 July 2007 - 09:35 AM.


#10 kleph

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Posted 28 July 2007 - 09:44 AM

i think the rule of thumb is 400 miles or four months. usually when i get in this range i start keeping track of little injuries a lot more because my legs know quite well when the give is gone from a pair of shoes.

#11 Jogger

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Posted 28 July 2007 - 10:31 AM

View Postseris, on Jul 27 2007, 11:26 PM, said:

Surely it depends on how heavy you are, foot strike etc... etc.
yes that's why I think 400-800km should cover that.
my wife has shocking feet issues and gets about 600km a pair (she is light). I can imagine a hefty person with bad feet only getting 400km.

#12 shark

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Posted 28 July 2007 - 12:40 PM

I aim for 800k from all shoes.  I had a pair of Adrenalines recently that were great to wear but felt really "flat" and with no bounce at 550k so they are my lawnmowing shoes now - they did not make it to 600k.  I have made it to 1000k but only once with a pair of Nimbus.  Most hit the bin between 750k-850k.

I keep exact measure of all shoes - I record the shoe in my running diary.

I find that I need 100k before I will use them for a long event such as a marathon in which I will compete.  I would not "compete" in a shoe over 700k but will drag them out as long as I believe they will not contribute to injury.  Over 700k is for short training runs - to get your moneys worth.  As soon as they feel flat then toss them - injury is expensive.

I find that cushioned shoes give the longest life and racing flats the shortest life.

Like Mrs Kev, if you have a specific problem then your rules are different.  Running is a reasonably cheap game.  Find out the correct shoe for you and get them - they will cost $100-$250 - then once you know your shoe, chase a good price locally.

s

#13 DECIM8

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Posted 28 July 2007 - 02:02 PM

Shark, Why are you wearing adrenalines and Nimbus? Opposing shoes? Nimbus prob lasted longer as its cushion specific, only speculation ;)

Edited by DECIM8, 28 July 2007 - 02:02 PM.


#14 shark

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Posted 28 July 2007 - 04:59 PM

Decim

Shoes are shoes - I have mild pronation / neutral and I find I can wear Adrenaline, 2120, Glycerin, Nimbus etc.  The shape and fit matter more to me.  I choose a shoe specific to the run I'm doing.  I would not wear the Adrenaline in a run longer than 15k because it is a D fitting whereas I have worn 2120 (2E or 4E) in a marathon.  I used to wear Nimbus in Marathons but I now find them a bit heavy and prefer a lighter but wider shoe.

I wear out so many, I like to try different brands and styles.  I'm also a sucker for a bargain - the Adrenalines were a previous model on the bargain table @ $90!  It turns out they were a good shoe and I'll buy them again - but only for short runs.

s

Edited by shark, 28 July 2007 - 05:02 PM.


#15 Morley

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Posted 28 July 2007 - 07:30 PM

This question comes up every now and again but I'm not clever enough to provide a link. It depends on a lot of variables and I find it even changes despite wearing the same shoe time and again. I get at least 600-800K. I have a couple of spare pairs and run with a new pair when I get in this range to get a comparison. I have a favourite pair I have retired to walking/casual duties that provides a comparison as well.

#16 MPH

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Posted 28 July 2007 - 07:33 PM

View PostJoggerKev, on Jul 28 2007, 10:31 AM, said:

yes that's why I think 400-800km should cover that.
my wife has shocking feet issues and gets about 600km a pair (she is light). I can imagine a hefty person with bad feet only getting 400km.


Yeah I now order a new pair when 400K ticks over, it's still cheaper than when I played golf...

#17 john stevens

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Posted 28 July 2007 - 09:02 PM

IF YOU CAN RUN SUB 32M 10KM ABOUT 8 WEEKS ....SUB 50M 10KM ABOUT 3 MONTHS

#18 chilliman

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Posted 30 July 2007 - 01:14 PM

tim said:

I know the air sole on the Pegasus goes after about 800km. You can still run in them but they squeak.

Many years ago I do recall getting a puncture mid race, more of a squealing fart type sound. In those days I ran in shoes until they fell apart. Can't remember what shoes they were but they did have twin airbags. I continued to run in them for the novelty factor on short races. ;)

With road shoes, usually shin pain is my first sign a new pair is required. The shoes still have many 100's of kms of trails left in them however, once they retire from road running.


tim said:

I do not keep track of mileage or when I buy my shoes so it more a feeling I get when I look to the west, And my spirit is crying for new shoes.

Tim, bustling through hedgerows will in fact reduce shoe longevity, and holding hands with May Queens whilst climbing stairs at 12ft will lead to complete breakdown. ;)

#19 DECIM8

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Posted 30 July 2007 - 02:27 PM

View Postshark, on Jul 28 2007, 04:59 PM, said:

Decim

Shoes are shoes - I have mild pronation / neutral and I find I can wear Adrenaline, 2120, Glycerin, Nimbus etc.  The shape and fit matter more to me.  I choose a shoe specific to the run I'm doing.  I would not wear the Adrenaline in a run longer than 15k because it is a D fitting whereas I have worn 2120 (2E or 4E) in a marathon.  I used to wear Nimbus in Marathons but I now find them a bit heavy and prefer a lighter but wider shoe.

I wear out so many, I like to try different brands and styles.  I'm also a sucker for a bargain - the Adrenalines were a previous model on the bargain table @ $90!  It turns out they were a good shoe and I'll buy them again - but only for short runs.

s

Fair enough, Thought you were trying to achive something, Strengthening etc lol Just a bargin hunter fair enough. The new Nimbus is a beaut it weights close to a running flat and kills the kayano for weight its like 180g or something insane. soft too...

Cheers

Just a tip on the trail running for the above, most offroad shoes come with a second layer or rock shield to protect the feet from hard impact and brusing from rocks and uneven terrain.  So perhaps offroad isnt the best for used runners... however I would prob do it..

Edited by DECIM8, 30 July 2007 - 02:30 PM.


#20 chilliman

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Posted 30 July 2007 - 03:37 PM

View PostDECIM8, on Jul 30 2007, 02:27 PM, said:

Just a tip on the trail running for the above, most offroad shoes come with a second layer or rock shield to protect the feet from hard impact and brusing from rocks and uneven terrain.  So perhaps offroad isnt the best for used runners... however I would prob do it..

Most of my trail running is on soft trails and mud, so the lighter the better from my perspective. Obviously if you are running hard rocky trails you will need shoes that will handle it.

Edited by chilliman, 30 July 2007 - 03:38 PM.


#21 FreeDickland

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Posted 13 September 2007 - 10:07 PM

A slightly different approach may be useful to think about based on recent experience -returning to running after a 3-4 month break caused by severe achilles tear - 8kilos heavier and significant loss of condition (previously doing around 6-8 hours most weeks - currently just 30 minutes every second day due to different recovery demands).

Also played hell with my shoe rotation practice which means delaying pleasure of new shoes for 3-4months! :)

Have never worried much about finding or giving an answer to the question "how far do you run" as I have always taken "a time on the legs approach" - get the time in and make sure hat it us used wisely in terms of your fitness, qoals etc., etc.

When I returned to running  I found that with loss of fitness, gain of weight and stride adjusted to avoid pain as much as practical I was running much slower (no surprise there) but also - with aid of my wifes pedometer - was taking far more strides than usual for the time and/or loop I was running.

Thinking then of shoe wear TWO NEW factors may well apply - and both may be more relevant than distance alone - these being:
Body Weight - heavier runner wearing out shoes faster and - more importantly - flattening out forefoot faster than previously lighter runner - and
Stride Length / Number of strides taken - shorter strides meaning more strides and faster wear/greater flattening.

#22 tank girl

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Posted 15 September 2007 - 09:40 PM

View Postmilov, on Jul 27 2007, 05:07 PM, said:

I currently have six pairs of useable road shoes and five pairs of racing flats. I rotate the shoes giving them more time to recover. If a pair of shoes gets used once a week instead of once a day then you get a far greater life expentency from them.
I have multiple pairs of shoes, but that's just so that any biomechanical disagreements I get from one pair of shoes are likely to balance out those of another pair. It sounds silly but since I started rotating different models instead of just a second pair of the same thing, I stopped getting so many niggles.

As for the life expectancy of your shoes... I'm always confused about the implications of this for ultra runners. Say your average runner is doing 10km per day... and changing shoes each day to keep them springy.  If the ultra runner does a 50km training run, does he/she need to change shoes every 10km?  If the ultra runner alternates shoes daily, after running his/her average of 30km, should the non-ultra runner only alternate shoes every third day? *confuzzled*

In addition to the materials and type of shoe, etc., I think shoe life is very largely related to how perfect the shoe is for you.  If it perfectly complements your running and doesn't fight you at all, it will last longer.  If you have a few disagreements, it will wear in strange places and grow to be less comfortable, so you will want a new shoe, or you will notice niggles.  If you fight it all the time, then you should wear it down quickly - which is probably a good thing!

Since I found my Merrell Overdrives, I no longer change shoes during ultras.  I went through three pairs of shoes in 100 miles at Glasshouse last year - fighting them - they were pretty much completely destroyed.  I've done three long ultras in these Overdrives without needing to change during the race.  I am in love.

#23 k_run

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Posted 17 September 2007 - 11:00 AM

Unfortunately, the cushioning of running shoes deteriorates quickly. After just 200km of running the pressure on the foot in running shoes has increased by 10%(1) and after 500km of running the pressure on the bottom of the foot has increased by 100%(2). With high pressure being associated with increased levels of foot pain, it is important to replace your footwear regularly.  

During repetitive loading the cells in the midsole foam rupture resulting in a loss of the cushioning properties of the foam. It is for this reason footwear companies use other materials such as air, gel or liquids to improve cushioning durability. When the ruptured cells become numerous they become visible as crease lines in the midsole foam.



1. Hennig EM, & Milani TL (2000). Sportverletz Sportschaden, 14, 90-97.
2. Verdejo R, & Mills NJ (2004). Polymer Testing, 23, 567-574.

Edited by k_run, 17 September 2007 - 11:01 AM.


#24 FakePlasticTrees

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Posted 17 September 2007 - 12:07 PM

View Posttank girl, on Sep 15 2007, 09:40 PM, said:

I have multiple pairs of shoes, but that's just so that any biomechanical disagreements I get from one pair of shoes are likely to balance out those of another pair. It sounds silly but since I started rotating different models instead of just a second pair of the same thing, I stopped getting so many niggles.

I agree with this whole heartedly. I've done the same thing using 3 different pairs of shoes from different manufacturers. I think has allowed me to have my longest continuous injury free running period. Not even any real niggles.

#25 mikij

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Posted 18 December 2007 - 10:39 AM

As most people said, the life of running shoes is 400 - 800 km, depending on where you run and on your weight.
Twice a year is quite acceptable, depending on your mileage. And, yes, change your runners every other day.
If you heavy overpronate or have any other feet problem, go to a specialty running store and the seller should be able to test you. The vendors can recommend you the exact type of shoes you need. They will probably tell you if it is already time to replace your running shoes (well, be cautious - they will certainly tell you to change them more often that needed - marketing - but won't tell you to use them if they are already over.). In some stores (here in Canada), they have even a camera and you and the seller can watch your feet's movements in order to correctly select the shoes.
Anyway, the running shoes are not like electronics - you can buy a Polar or Timex on the internet, but not your runners. They have to be adapted to your feet.

Edited by mikij, 18 December 2007 - 10:41 AM.


#26 brizza

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Posted 18 December 2007 - 11:09 AM

a few years ago the shoe companies started making their midsoles very soft to give the sensation of "run ready"shoes as you try them on in the shop,previously midsoles were quite hard to begin with and the mid soles softened after a fwe hundred k's then you got a great feeling shoe for maybe a thousand k's total,the soft midsoles only lasted five hundred k's max,a new generation of runners came along and this was normal for them,now they have got a bit harder again so the longevity has improved again,normal runners used on trails never last as long due to the "points"(stones)of pressure on the midsole aging it prematurely-briz

#27 Louise

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Posted 18 December 2007 - 03:18 PM

View Postbrizza, on Dec 18 2007, 12:09 PM, said:

...,normal runners used on trails never last as long due to the "points"(stones)of pressure on the midsole aging it prematurely

Briz, can you expand on this please? I've always started new shoes on the trail precisely because they don't (appear to) wear out. After a couplahundred kays trailrunning, I rotate them onto street running, where the soles then start to wear out.

L

#28 brizza

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Posted 18 December 2007 - 03:40 PM

View PostLouise, on Dec 18 2007, 04:18 PM, said:

Briz, can you expand on this please? I've always started new shoes on the trail precisely because they don't (appear to) wear out. After a couplahundred kays trailrunning, I rotate them onto street running, where the soles then start to wear out.

L
you are correct,the outsoles don't seem to wear much on shoes used on trails,i used to go hashing in a pair of modified brooks in the desert and they never wore out at all but the midsole compressed to nothing,say you weigh 70 kilos and you stand on a stone,the force is concentrated on that point compressing the midsole with the full 70 kgs momentarily,normal running on a flat surface distributes the weight over the whole sole so no point gets the whole amount so no midsole fatigue,also maybe you don't weigh much or are very efficient as a runner and get a lot of life from your shoes anyway-briz

#29 FiveDockTim

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Posted 11 January 2008 - 01:59 PM

I agree, Running shoes wear out between 500-1000km (depending on your foot, weight, etc), these companies are the same as apple forcing you into the latest ipod because it is no longer compatible with old attachments. They are made to wear out. The first sign i use to get a new pair is when I start to feel more niggles following a normal run. Time to get a new pair. I have recently tried the video analysis in Sydney CBD, well worth it, also they emailed me the footage for future reference. Pretty cool. Got a great new pair of shoes too!

Happy Running

#30 bluesman

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Posted 17 January 2008 - 09:30 PM

View Posttim, on Jul 27 2007, 01:49 AM, said:

I know the air sole on the Pegasus goes after about 800km. You can still run in them but they squeak.I do not keep track of mileage or when I buy my shoes so it more a feeling I get when I look to the west, And my spirit is crying for new shoes.that and my legs feel more tired than usual.
get into volleys they last forever

#31 Bellthorpe

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Posted 18 January 2008 - 05:20 PM

I throw my shoes out at 500 miles, before I feel that they absolutely must be thrown out.


#32 essaytee

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Posted 19 January 2008 - 09:16 AM

I retired a pair of Kayano's after 1130 km last week.    Usually it's around the 800 km mark.

#33 RL44

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Posted 24 May 2008 - 08:31 PM

View PostFiveDockTim, on Jan 10 2008, 10:59 PM, said:

I have recently tried the video analysis in Sydney CBD, well worth it, also they emailed me the footage for future reference. Pretty cool. Got a great new pair of shoes too!

Happy Running

Tim, can you tell me the name of this place please? Or if you can't remember the name, then where it is in the CBD? I want to give it a go before I buy my next pair of shoes.

Thanks,

RL44.

#34 BrisMatt

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Posted 29 September 2008 - 09:49 PM

How long do running shoes last?

Answer:  Had my ASICS 2130 since 27 Apr 08.  It is now 152 days later and I have done 1646km in them.  Average 10.8km per day at an average overall speed of 4min48sec/km.  In this time I have done a marathon, 1/2 marathon, 2 * 10km races, Kokoda Challenge (96km of hills), Glasshouse 100km trail run, and all the training in between including 47km on the road on Sunday.  I have to admit that they are getting a bit worn (right more than left), and will be replaced soon, but it is not an emergency yet.

And, no injuries (touch wood).  I weigh 80km.

800km for me is new.  Perhaps we are all just conned by the shoe manufacturers into believing that runners need to be binned before they have really been used up.

Matt

#35 Bellthorpe

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Posted 29 September 2008 - 10:06 PM

View PostBrisMatt, on Sep 29 2008, 09:49 PM, said:

And, no injuries (touch wood).  I weigh 80km.

Wow! 80km is a long way to weigh.

#36 MissPinkyInSydney

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Posted 30 September 2008 - 09:27 AM

View PostBrisMatt, on Sep 29 2008, 09:49 PM, said:

How long do running shoes last?

Answer:  Had my ASICS 2130 since 27 Apr 08.  It is now 152 days later and I have done 1646km in them.  Average 10.8km per day at an average overall speed of 4min48sec/km.  In this time I have done a marathon, 1/2 marathon, 2 * 10km races, Kokoda Challenge (96km of hills), Glasshouse 100km trail run, and all the training in between including 47km on the road on Sunday.  I have to admit that they are getting a bit worn (right more than left), and will be replaced soon, but it is not an emergency yet.

And, no injuries (touch wood).  I weigh 80km.

800km for me is new.  Perhaps we are all just conned by the shoe manufacturers into believing that runners need to be binned before they have really been used up.

Matt

I love ASICS runners but I am a bit disappointed in my 2130's.  I only got them at the end of July and I have only done about 300kms in them and the foam around the inside of the heel area is already starting to chew out.  It means I have to wear tape every time I run to stop blisters.  This has not happened to me with any other ASICS I have owned.  I do notice this pair of runners has a much "spongier" heel area than my previous shoes (2120's I think??) so maybe this is what is causing my heel to rub away the inside of the shoe??  BrisMatt - I would be delighted getting 1600K's out of a pair of runners!  That would be just about a year for me!

#37 footpoint

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Posted 01 October 2008 - 09:51 AM

View PostMissPinkyInSydney, on Sep 30 2008, 09:27 AM, said:

I love ASICS runners but I am a bit disappointed in my 2130's.  I only got them at the end of July and I have only done about 300kms in them and the foam around the inside of the heel area is already starting to chew out.  It means I have to wear tape every time I run to stop blisters.  This has not happened to me with any other ASICS I have owned.  I do notice this pair of runners has a much "spongier" heel area than my previous shoes (2120's I think??) so maybe this is what is causing my heel to rub away the inside of the shoe??  BrisMatt - I would be delighted getting 1600K's out of a pair of runners!  That would be just about a year for me!

Hi MissPinky, this can happen from time to time. I would suggest you take them back to the store you bought them from and they should sort you out. As a retailer I have seen this on a reasonably regular basis and this can be a manufacturing fault. The new PHF (personal heel fit) material that Asics have introduced to their shoes may not suit you as well as your previous however this should def not happen in the time you have had them.

If you have any probs, let me know.
cheers

#38 RunBare

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Posted 13 October 2008 - 09:57 PM

My current footwear of choice has been going for about 3,500k now.  I've grown quite attached to them.

#39 tim

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Posted 13 October 2008 - 10:05 PM

View PostRunBare, on Oct 13 2008, 09:57 PM, said:

My current footwear of choice has been going for about 3,500k now.  I've grown quite attached to them.

wow that is a heap of miles.  I want a pair.  do they come in my size?

#40 RWO

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Posted 05 November 2008 - 10:07 AM

View Postfootpoint, on Oct 1 2008, 10:51 AM, said:

Hi MissPinky, this can happen from time to time. I would suggest you take them back to the store you bought them from and they should sort you out. As a retailer I have seen this on a reasonably regular basis and this can be a manufacturing fault. The new PHF (personal heel fit) material that Asics have introduced to their shoes may not suit you as well as your previous however this should def not happen in the time you have had them.

If you have any probs, let me know.
cheers

If all else is equal, (ie no addition of orthotics, different sporting use such as aerobic/fitness classes etc) and you have degradation of the medial heel, then your retailer will be able to return these for you.  Asics, like most major brands are usually very good at standing behind their product.  If you are using orthoses however, then you may struggle...make sure you point out that your usuage history is the same as the last pair, but the wear is clearly premature.

#41 Sir Runalot

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Posted 07 November 2008 - 11:13 AM

I run in Locos on all surfaces and have done for a number of years. Occasionally I try something else and always find myself returning to them - like the breakfast cereal they're 'just right' for me (and good value too).  I usually run two pairs at a time and expect to get 1000km + form each pair. I keep a log of shoe wear in my training diary, I highly recommend this. I never race in brand new shoes, always have a few runs in them before use in competition. Trail running definitely cuts down wear on the sole [and knees, and ankles, and hips]. Body weight is a big factor in wear I'm sure, but if you're only getting 400-500km from a pair of shoes I'd be trying something else.

#42 ratdog

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Posted 07 November 2008 - 12:41 PM

Beware the aglet blowouts!!!!!!

#43 walshy2

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Posted 07 November 2008 - 08:11 PM

wants and needs are clearly separate
I use about 4 pairs of shoes in rotation at any given time and so am always "retiring" a pair as I acquire a new pair. Once I've done approx 600km in a pair I rarely would use them as I would have bought the latest shoe that took my fancy! and so the older one just sits in the wardrobe.
I think I have more money than sense though as the shoes I retire are probably fine....oh well at least I have quite a few choices when deciding what to wear when mowing the lawn

#44 jdickenson

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Posted 27 November 2008 - 05:48 PM

View Postwalshy2, on Nov 7 2008, 09:11 PM, said:

wants and needs are clearly separate
I use about 4 pairs of shoes in rotation at any given time and so am always "retiring" a pair as I acquire a new pair. Once I've done approx 600km in a pair I rarely would use them as I would have bought the latest shoe that took my fancy! and so the older one just sits in the wardrobe.
I think I have more money than sense though as the shoes I retire are probably fine....oh well at least I have quite a few choices when deciding what to wear when mowing the lawn

Between 600-800km is correct and actually recommended by many running footwear suppliers. This will obviously vary depending on the weight of the person. Mizuno claim with their shoes that once you can "bend it in half" the cushioning is as good as gone in the shoe.

#45 steviecat

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Posted 05 February 2009 - 02:10 PM

Hi All,

Can anyone tell me whether doing stretches like single leg heel drops off a step will shorten the life of my runners. I was thinking possibly yes as there is lot of pressure on a small strip across the sole of the shoe and occasional slipping. Should I go barefoot or change into older shoes to do this stretch?

Cheers
Steve

#46 Sunset

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Posted 05 February 2009 - 02:21 PM

IK, it would be in their best interests to tell you that, don't you think?

#47 blair

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Posted 05 February 2009 - 02:57 PM

View Poststeviecat, on Feb 5 2009, 02:10 PM, said:

Can anyone tell me whether doing stretches like single leg heel drops off a step will shorten the life of my runners. I was thinking possibly yes as there is lot of pressure on a small strip across the sole of the shoe and occasional slipping. Should I go barefoot or change into older shoes to do this stretch?

My take on this would be that the part of your shoe that is resting on the step is not part of the shoe that contacts the ground so it shouldn't be a problem. But YMMV.

View PostIronkid94, on Feb 5 2009, 02:16 PM, said:

I got a question on running shoes: Would they get wrecked walking the Kokoda Challenge in them?

I'm not familiar with what the track is like but I find that any long trail run trashes the soles of my shoes so I always wear an old pair.

View PostIronkid94, on Feb 5 2009, 02:18 PM, said:

Also Shoes should be replaced every 400Km - 600Km thats what I was told by the guy who works at the Athletes shoe store.

First, I wouldn't trust Athlete's Foot. Go to InTraining or some other specialist running store. Second, you should get more than 400-600kms out of a pair of shoes. I don't think about replacing them until 1000km but of course you should be guided by the wear on them and how compressed the rubber of the sole becomes.

#48 Fossil

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Posted 05 February 2009 - 03:01 PM

In my opinion, it depends on the structure of the shoe. The more complex the structure, the quicker it will breakdown as there are more joints in the shoe where materials are stuck together, are there is more rigidity. If you heel strike then you'll be putting massive pressure on the heel every step  and compressing that part. You'll also be bending the rest of the layers in the shoe as  you strike, roll and propel. On the other hand if you are a mid-foot or fore-foot striker then you'll be using your legs to absorb much more of the (lesser) impact and so damage the shoe (and probably your knees, legs and hips) far less.

I use Nike Frees which are very simple - if the upper doesn't tear then they'd last me about a year. I run about 100Km per week but about 20Km is barefoot so that's 80 x 52 =4160Kms if they manage the full year - but I would say 8 months is more likely, which works out at 3,000Kms  ;)

Edited by Fossil, 05 February 2009 - 03:09 PM.


#49 twosheds

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Posted 05 February 2009 - 06:41 PM

Its the midsole of the shoe that decays- the shoe can look in perfect order but the cushioning goes. The standard rule of thumb is 800-1000km ( and that is walking, playing any kind of sport etc) but it varies runner to runner- some people are very hard on thier shoes some are not.
Often your body tells you first-  a little knee pain or muscle soreness orjust taking a bit longer to recover than usual. it often clears up in new shoes. Of course there is a gradual deterioration in the shoes over this period-
the midsole will also breakdown over time even if you don't wear them at all- so thats why its not a good idea to buy multiples at one time.
Hope that helps
two sheds

#50 Swaggers

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Posted 06 February 2009 - 09:17 AM

View PostIronkid94, on Feb 5 2009, 04:18 PM, said:

Also Shoes should be replaced every 400Km - 600Km thats what I was told by the guy who works at the Athletes shoe store.

Kid.  I think the shoe-shop sales person gave you sensible and refreshingly honest advice.  He or she could have told you that the shoes will last 1200km and made a quick sale.  Instead they told 400 to 600km which is within the safety zone.  So rather than make a sale they indicated that there was a risk in wearing shoes over 600km.

I manage my shoes as follows. Lets say you use mid-price range, neutral shoes.  Keeping in mind TwoSheds observation, I think it best to rotate your shoes.  This is because shoes just don't all of sudden become worn out.  I find that at around 400km shoes are no longer providing the necessary cushioning to run fast on hard surfaces.   I will run long runs on trails in shoes up until around 600km.  Beyond that the risk of injury kicks in.    I semi-retire them and use them for my shorter recovery runs, warm up and warm down or trail runs up to 16km.  

These days i seldom keep shoes for more than 800km.  

So roughly speaking for mid-range shoes.  0 to 200 - shoes pretty well retain their properties; 200 to 400 -they start to go off;  400 to 600 -they no longer retain all their cushioning and support properties; 600 to 800  time to consider new shoes - be careful; 800 to 1000 don't hammer yourself over long distances - high risk use.

Of course, as with all running, there are a lot of variables.  For instance; the efficiency and pace of the runner; how much running is done on really tired legs.  Someone running 180 km a week at pace is going to require shoes that retain their properties; whereas a slower efficient jogger could perhaps get away with shoes that are past their usefulness for another faster or less efficient runner.  

Hope this helps.

Cheers and best wishes.

Edited by Swaggers, 06 February 2009 - 09:19 AM.