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Lore Of Runningand similar reference books


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#1 Maygan

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Posted 17 April 2008 - 06:53 PM

After searching through the various discusssions about good books I've decided Lore of Running would be a good place to start as a reference guide to have on hand.

I'm fairly green when it comes to this sort of technical knowledge so I'm wondering what other books can people suggest that could help me in learning more generally about anatomy, exercise physiology, nutrition and all the wierd and wonderful science-y stuff that goes on inside the body while you're running.

Cheers

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#2 Jogger

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Posted 18 April 2008 - 02:55 PM

I bought the lore of running and barely read it - I am not a technical kind of guy - happy to sell it on at a good price. Not sure what reprint, but doubt a lot has changed (if you are dead set on the latest reprint then mine's no good as its approx 10 years old).

#3 kathmandu

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Posted 18 April 2008 - 03:16 PM

Hey Meganh,

Lore of Running is really intense. I love it, but then obviously others dont (a la Kev!). Its very science based and goes into the various physiological and biochemical models. I found i had to read a bit then run and digest it, then read a bit more. And still i could re-read it another 20 times and still learn stuff. If that sounds of interest to you, then knock youself out!

If however, youd prefer something a little more relaxed to start with then theres heaps of options. Search 'running' on amazon.com and have a look at the variety.

Daniels Running Formula is excellent. It looks at running more from a coach's perspective in that it described runners attributes and how to get the most out of runners. Obviously that can be applied to yourself. Theres great info on understanding training methods and how to apply them (ie preparing a program).  

The Runners World series of books are all really good too and probably less intense than Daniels.

The COmplete Book of Running for Women is a good introductory book.

Also theres some excellent inspirational type books. George Sheehan books are fab, he just makes me smile and love life! But also Running Within (jerry Lynch) is tops. And I Run Therefore I am Nuts (Bob Schwartz) is quite a laugh.

Anyhow....my advice....have a play on Amazon and read the excerpts and see what tickles your fancy!
Good luck

Oh - the other option is to checkout mcmillanrunning.com It has great info.....for free

#4 Maygan

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Posted 18 April 2008 - 06:36 PM

Thanks anyway JoggerKev, I went and bought a copy at lunchtime today.  It looks pretty intense!!  I'm a scientist though so I'm one of those people who I love that stuff

And thanks for the other suggestions PsychoChicken I'm surfing amazon for as we speak!

#5 Martin D

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Posted 18 April 2008 - 07:27 PM

View Postmeganh, on Apr 18 2008, 06:36 PM, said:

Thanks anyway JoggerKev, I went and bought a copy at lunchtime today.  It looks pretty intense!!  I'm a scientist though so I'm one of those people who I love that stuff

In that case I'd also recommend Better Training for Distance Runners by David Martin and Peter Coe (Seb's dad and coach).

I've got both, but I'm a scientist who likes that sort of thing too.

Martin

#6 mosmanmum

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Posted 18 April 2008 - 07:59 PM

View Postmeganh, on Apr 17 2008, 07:53 PM, said:

After searching through the various discusssions about good books I've decided Lore of Running would be a good place to start as a reference guide to have on hand.

I'm fairly green when it comes to this sort of technical knowledge so I'm wondering what other books can people suggest that could help me in learning more generally about anatomy, exercise physiology, nutrition and all the wierd and wonderful science-y stuff that goes on inside the body while you're running.

Cheers

Given that you're searching Amazon you've probably already stumbled across Matt Fitzgerald's Brain Training For Running but personally, I love this one. I do have Lore of Running and while I wouldn't settle into it each evening before bed I enjoy dipping in and out of it and I always learn something from it. Good luck with the search.

#7 plu

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Posted 20 April 2008 - 12:00 AM

Lore of Running is a well thumbed book of mine and have done the rounds of a few cool runners.  I purchased it is a book shop in San Fransisco in 1992.  

I had never seen a book shop with so many running books - pre Amazon and Borders etc.

cheers  Plu

#8 SouthAustralian

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Posted 20 April 2008 - 09:00 PM

View Postplu, on Apr 19 2008, 11:30 PM, said:

Lore of Running is a well thumbed book of mine and have done the rounds of a few cool runners. I purchased it is a book shop in San Fransisco in 1992.

I had never seen a book shop with so many running books - pre Amazon and Borders etc.

cheers Plu

Thanks Plu, Ive just ordered it at my local library!
Chers
Frank in SA

#9 ingrid

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Posted 21 April 2008 - 07:04 AM

View PostJoggerKev, on Apr 18 2008, 02:55 PM, said:

I bought the lore of running and barely read it - I am not a technical kind of guy - happy to sell it on at a good price. Not sure what reprint, but doubt a lot has changed (if you are dead set on the latest reprint then mine's no good as its approx 10 years old).

Hi Kev,
I'd like to buy this book from you, are you going to be at TNF100?
Otherwise what are your next races?
I am thinking about Bay to Bay (June), Fatass Palm Beach to Manly and then Gold Coast Marathon.
Otherwise I'm happy to pay for postage etc, let me know what you think. Thanks, Ingrid:)

Sorry, I tried to PM you about this, but it returned as error.

#10 Eagle

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Posted 21 April 2008 - 07:59 AM

Noakes is a great reference book but not one yuo would read cover to cover as a good gernal overview of all the aspects of running at a basic level.  

You want a good book that covers a very wide range of running related topics I would highly recommend this book :

Frank Shorter's Book

:LOL:

#11 Greg_Waite

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Posted 26 April 2008 - 07:00 AM

Other locally grown books which are readable for their story as well as having a very sensible approach are "Run Easy" by Ron Clark and anything by Arthur Lydiard.  

For those who like to read hard-core running stuff, after "Lore of Running" try these newer books "Running with the Legends" (in depth interviews with many great runners) and "Running Tough" (top runners talk about their favourite training sessions, grouped up into categories with a very sensible overview for each).

#12 Grechy

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Posted 15 January 2011 - 09:24 AM

I have recently purchased Lore Of Running. I intend to slowly ready every page although it might take me a few years to get through as I don't have as much time as I used to for this sort of stuff. I have promised myself it will be the last running book that I ever buy!

I am currently reading Steve Moneghetti's biography which is also a good read although it was written in 1996, I would find it more interesting to read a biography of his last 15 years where perhaps some light could be shed on how he has defied the ageing process and can still run remarkable times at 48.

#13 MrUniqueName

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Posted 15 January 2011 - 09:36 AM

View PostGrechy, on Jan 15 2011, 09:24 AM, said:

I have recently purchased Lore Of Running. I intend to slowly ready every page although it might take me a few years to get through as I don't have as much time as I used to for this sort of stuff.

You'll love it! I find it much easier to just use it as a reference book - eg, when I want to read about something like cramping, I'll look up cramping. I think that I would get overwhelmed trying to read it front to back, it's just such a mammoth book with so much info!

#14 Ponytail

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Posted 15 January 2011 - 08:12 PM

Not much of a book reader, personally, especially heavy, info laden ones.  I find Runners World mag provides all the info I need (with enough Science, but not too much) and if I'm still left with any questions I turn to my good friend, "Google"!

#15 Kathymac

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Posted 15 January 2011 - 09:01 PM

I have a lot of running books but I would have to say Lore of Running remains my bible. So much information in the one spot. I started off trying to read it cover to cover but only managed to get about a third of the way through before giving up. Now I just dip in and out. You may be a bit more dedicated than me, though Grechy, so good luck.
I am a scientist so I appreciate the references to studies to back up the information presented, although I understand that would be a turn off for a lot of people. It is still an easier read than most of the textbooks I have.

#16 batavia

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Posted 15 January 2011 - 10:19 PM

There is a great Podcase interview with Tim Noakes at http://www.marathont...tim-noakes.html

#17 Supersam1979

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Posted 24 February 2011 - 03:08 PM

My oldman played tennis with Noakes back in the days before he was even running. He is a good guy and although I love Lore of Running, if you want a more easy to understand book that will change your life then you can't go further than 'Everyone's Guide to Distance running' by Norrie Williamson. This book sits next to my bed ans has been read cover to cover numerous times.

He is a friend of Noakes and Fordyce and offers some interesting different methods of training for ultras and marathons. I have certainly seen my running improve since following his suggestions together with those of Daniels.

#18 Bellthorpe

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Posted 24 February 2011 - 03:45 PM

I borrowed the Noakes book from the local library. A good read, an appropriate mix of anecdote and technical, and I finished it over two weekends.