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Read Any Good Running Books Lately?


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#51 AngelicOne

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Posted 31 August 2008 - 10:03 AM

G'day there Ican;

I've read DK's book as well, and yes agreed, there was a lot of the American hero kind of style associated with it, but having said that, I too enjoyed it immensely.

Although not having run 30kms and beyond myself 'recently', I don't think you'd need to go as far as DK to find out the motivation.

Ask around on this website and the ultra boys and girls who do the amazingly huge kilometres would be able to tell you, I'm sure.

But I don't think it would be boredom ... it'd be more of a sense of amazing achievement in that you can push your body and your mind to places and distances that you never thought possible.

For me, I'm so looking forward to when I'll be trained up enough to be able to tackle those distances.  It's just something that is burning inside me that I'm wishing to do.

A.O.

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#52 Goughy

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Posted 07 September 2008 - 06:35 PM

I'm glancing around on amazon at the moment to try and find some stuff to read.  Runners World Run Less Run Faster is one that caught my eye.  But there's like 600 books listed!

Does anyone have any suggestions on some good books for a beginner?  I like to get into the technique of things - about running form etc.  And I want to know more about the different training techniques - not just how to do them, but why do them and what the benefits are.

#53 73Robbo

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Posted 07 September 2008 - 09:28 PM

View PostCrazyPom, on Aug 9 2008, 02:16 AM, said:

The Looniness of the Long Distance Runner is a humourus book for first time marathoners. Not a lot of good advice but true to life account nevertheless. About a London journalist who goes from couch to NYC marathon in a year.

I had a good chuckle at Looniness I must admit - a bit UK-centric but quite amusing nonetheless.

#54 kathmandu

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Posted 07 September 2008 - 09:58 PM

View PostGoughy, on Sep 7 2008, 04:35 PM, said:

I'm glancing around on amazon at the moment to try and find some stuff to read.  Runners World Run Less Run Faster is one that caught my eye.  But there's like 600 books listed!

Does anyone have any suggestions on some good books for a beginner?  I like to get into the technique of things - about running form etc.  And I want to know more about the different training techniques - not just how to do them, but why do them and what the benefits are.
Hi Goughy

The Runners World series of books are pretty good. i guess it depends a bit on how in depth you want to read. I have a couple of them and they are more sort of motivational than scientific, but if thats what you are after then they are a good choice.

Noakes (Lore of Running) is unreal if you are interested in the scientific theory behind it all, otherwise its probably a bit intense.

Daniels Running Formula is a good place to start in my opinion, i love this book. It goes through the physiology side then into how to plan a program.

Alternatively, or even in the meantime till your books arrive, check out the Macmillan runningwebsite, it has some great info on training.

Hope that helps.

#55 Goughy

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Posted 08 September 2008 - 06:11 AM

Thanks PC!!  You've got me flashing back on maybe the greatest Red Faces Skit on Hey Hey It's Saturday!!


#56 bellabean

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Posted 08 September 2008 - 02:26 PM

View PostLinkspurr, on Aug 9 2008, 04:13 PM, said:

Well thanks to this thread I'm all inspired to do some reading.

I recently finished Paula Radcliffe's book which was enjoyable, perhaps just a little self-serving.

Anyway with my inspiration in mind I found a great website:  BetterWorld.com (http://www.BetterWorld.com/)

"Fund literacy, care for the environment, and get a fair price on the books you want.  2 Million Used Books. Free shipping in the USA, $2.97 worldwide. "

You can buy both new and second hand books at reasonable prices as the shipping is more than fair.  I put my order in yesterday and got an email this morning saying its been shipped.  Ended up buying  

Lore of Running by Timothy D. Noakes  $5.48
The Principles of Running: Practical Lessons from My First 100,000 Miles by Amby Burfoot  $3.98
The Courage To Start: A Guide To Running for Your Life by John "The Penguin" Bingham  $4.48
The Complete Book of Running by James Fixx  $3.48

add in the shipping cost and it came to $29.50 - not bad.  

So far so good, fingers crossed my books arrive in the 14 - 21 days promised.


OMG! I am so in the bad books - excuse the pun for overspending on Amazon! I am a total book addict and now I share my addiction with running, I'm a running book addict.

I've just ordered from BetterWorld.com

The Courage to Start
Ultra Marathon Man
Swoosh: The Unorthorized Nike Story

All for just under $50 including postage.

What a fantastic website an amazing idea! I can't wait to get hold of the books as am back to reading fiction now as my running books have all been consumed!

I also just finished the Paula Radcliffe book and have mixed views about it, it was introspective but also an interesting insight into what she has put herself through due to her various injuries to get herself back running marathons again.

Happy Reading!!

#57 ShufflingLea

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Posted 08 September 2008 - 08:19 PM

Has anyone read "What I talk about when I talk about running" yet?

Ned, I know you've got this one, have you got through it?  I've read a few reviews about it recently in papers and magazines, and it sounds interesting but I'd rather hear something about it by actual (running) readers...

#58 phYx

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Posted 08 September 2008 - 08:37 PM

I've just started reading the Murakami (What I Talk About...). I am a big Murakami fan and have always bought his books as soon as they are out so of course I love it. So far it is a little philosophical in nature, containing some of his rambling thoughts, in his typical writing style. Why don't you go to a bookshop and read the first few pages? You'll know instantly if you like it or not.

#59 hidalgo

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Posted 08 September 2008 - 09:45 PM

I really enjoyed My Life on the Run by Bart Yasso - he writes about all different types and aspects of running, like Badwater, nudist races, pacer tales, organising events, duathlons and loads of other adventures.  It's an easy enjoyable read, and inspirational without all the chest-thumping of some other books.

#60 kathmandu

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Posted 08 September 2008 - 11:41 PM

View PostGoughy, on Sep 8 2008, 04:11 AM, said:

Thanks PC!!  You've got me flashing back on maybe the greatest Red Faces Skit on Hey Hey It's Saturday!!
oh thats so funny.

im gonna be singing that all night now. and those moves....im off to practise.

#61 Ned

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Posted 09 September 2008 - 11:02 AM

View PostShufflingLea, on Sep 8 2008, 08:19 PM, said:

Has anyone read "What I talk about when I talk about running" yet?

Ned, I know you've got this one, have you got through it?  I've read a few reviews about it recently in papers and magazines, and it sounds interesting but I'd rather hear something about it by actual (running) readers...

Shuffling Lea,
I am about half way through, it's an easy read and yes he does ramble a bit and take a few detours in his writing about running. This may sound weird but even though it is about running, it doesn't really seem to be about running. If you want to read a book purely about running then I'd give it a miss. Having said that though, I am enjoying it but not so much as a running book.

#62 AngelicOne

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Posted 09 September 2008 - 11:08 AM

[ Ned wrote:    I am about half way through, it's an easy read and yes he does ramble a bit and take a few detours in his writing about running. This may sound weird but even though it is about running, it doesn't really seem to be about running. If you want to read a book purely about running then I'd give it a miss. Having said that though, I am enjoying it but not so much as a running book]



8)  :)

#63 BLUEBOY

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Posted 09 September 2008 - 11:17 AM

i am about half way thru " what i talk about when i talk about running" i am enjoying it, as for running books Noakes is a pretty good read as well as the Deek book about marathons if you can find it.

i'd have to say one of the best books about running i have read is Percy Cerutty ..why die..

a real life character.i wish there were more Australian books rather than the influx of USA books, but
i guess thats just the population readership etc.

#64 orlando

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Posted 09 September 2008 - 11:42 AM

I've read the first couple of chapters of What I talk about when I talk about running and I'm loving it, but I'd agree with the other opinions here.  It's not really about running as such - more a philosophical ramble diarising a few years of his life that happened to include a lot of running.  So far, it's just as much about writing as it is about running - and he draws some interesting parallels.

I should probably add that I'm a huge Murakami fan and would read his shopping lists if that was the only new stuff available, so I'm maybe not the most impartial of critics!

#65 Espress0

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Posted 09 September 2008 - 01:42 PM

Just bought some solid reading material after reading the above posts.  Great topic and some good recommendations. :)

#66 Ned

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Posted 09 September 2008 - 01:43 PM

View PostAngelicOne, on Sep 9 2008, 11:08 AM, said:

[ Ned wrote:    I am about half way through, it's an easy read and yes he does ramble a bit and take a few detours in his writing about running. This may sound weird but even though it is about running, it doesn't really seem to be about running. If you want to read a book purely about running then I'd give it a miss. Having said that though, I am enjoying it but not so much as a running book]



8)  :)


OK, sorry!! I think my answer itself was a bit rambling.......

#67 AngelicOne

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Posted 09 September 2008 - 02:25 PM

QUOTE (AngelicOne @ Sep 9 2008, 11:08 AM)
[ Ned wrote: I am about half way through, it's an easy read and yes he does ramble a bit and take a few detours in his writing about running. This may sound weird but even though it is about running, it doesn't really seem to be about running. If you want to read a book purely about running then I'd give it a miss. Having said that though, I am enjoying it but not so much as a running book]


OK, sorry!! I think my answer itself was a bit rambling.......



* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Hey, no worries ... it's sounding like it could be a worthwhile book to obtain ...

#68 ShufflingLea

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Posted 09 September 2008 - 04:52 PM

Thanks for the responses.  Sounds like I probably would enjoy Murakami's book, but I'll take phYx's advice and flick through it at the bookshop this weekend.  

While I'm there, it also sounds like I should pick up "Lore of running" too!

#69 BOD

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Posted 10 September 2008 - 03:00 PM

For Fathers’ Day, my daughter gave me a copy of “What I talk about when I talk about running” by Haruki Murakami. I was still reading it when the book popped up in this thread.

I read it right on the heels of reading “Strides” by Ben Cheever. The books are similar in that they each contain essays written by world-acclaimed writers who are obsessed with running. [Murakami had completed 22 marathons and Cheevers 45 when their respective books were published].

Each writer recounts how he took up running and how his life has been transformed. Beyond that, they are completely different books.

Murakami’s book is contemplative and almost completely introspective. He explores the physical and emotional impact of running, particularly on his own development as a runner and a writer.  In both roles, he sees ‘talent’ as being the smallest weapon in his armoury, with ‘focus’ and ‘endurance’ as the reasons for his progress.

Most of his topics can be seen in the CR forums: trials and tribulations of racing and training, the work/running balance, the onset of "running blues” after the achievement of a significant goal, the initially faltering entry into triathalons and other topics are covered. Even his “power music” gets a mention [Lovin’ Spoonful, Eric Clapton, Rolling Stones].

This summary might seem to reduce the book to a running blog. However, the beauty and simple elegance of the writing make it special. He is always effective. You can even feel the damp chill as Murakami describes the onset of winter in Boston.

Murakami’s description of the pain felt in the closing stages of a long race will, I suspect, become the inspiration (or surreptitious source) of bloggers wishing to describe a common experience in an uncommon way. Although many of the exploits and feelings covered in the book will be familiar to most runners, I think that readers will enjoy the honest and graceful way that they are covered. Part way through the book, Murakami states, “I only have a few reasons to keep running and a truckload of them to quit. All I can do is keep the few reasons nicely polished.’” He certainly achieves that.

In Murakami’s book, other runners make brief cameo appearances. In “Strides”, Ben Cheever seeks them out energetically. His fascination with and obvious like for Kenyan runners takes him (as part of a tour group) to the hills above the Rift Valley to spend some time with the Kalenjin people. Here he delights in the “excellence and so little pretension” of his running hosts and their people.

In other chapters he runs a bizarre night-time 10K in Baghdad, carries a hangover throughout the Medoc Marathon, and acts as a volunteer in the New York Marathon. He also seeks out experts with whom discuss the contentious question of the health benefits (or otherwise) of running. Like most topics in the book, however, he skims the surface in an entertaining way rather than investigating in depth.

Cheever’s obvious interest in the history of running is handled the way that we might deal with an “All you can eat” buffet; just a little bit of everything: prostitutes racing in ancient Athens, races between footmen of the English aristocracy, the Bunion Derbies, odd anecdotes from the modern Olympics and so on.

“Strides” is not just a collection of madcap, name-dropping people and places by a paid scribe. Cheever seems to inhale anything to do with running. He loves it and most of the people involved in it. [A notable exception would appear to be Jeff Galloway, the tour leader on a trip to Athens]. He skilfully produces pen-portraits of people he has met. Some of these people are famous, most of them are not.

Cheever also has a self-deprecating humour. Occasionally, he will also deliberately display the self-doubt resulting from being the writing son of a famous writing father.

Of the two, I enjoyed “Strides” more. Having said that, I am glad I now have both of them. They are skilfully written by acclaimed writers who obviously love to run.

Apologies for this long-winded response to some of the earlier posts on Murakami's book!

#70 maryclaire

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Posted 10 September 2008 - 04:22 PM

BOD - that was a great review.  I was given an Amazon voucher for my b'day and I've been waiting for a good review of a running book to spend it on.  I think I'll get them both.

ShufflingLea, I really have gotten a huge amount of value from Lore of Running.  I would recommend it if you want to know the "why" and "how" of what we are doing.

#71 Espress0

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Posted 21 September 2008 - 02:23 PM

Based on earlier posts, I've been trying to find a copy of: 'Touch the top of the world'.

Here is an example of what I'm finding:

10/9: Touch the Top of the World - I am so sorry but the title that you ordered is now out of print and we had to remove it from our website. It is very disappointing when this happens so please accept our apologies. I did some research to see if there was an alternative edition available but there is nothing else to choose from. So I have cancelled your order.

Does anyone have a copy they're finished with and wouldn't mind forwarding or lending?

Edited by Espress0, 21 September 2008 - 02:24 PM.


#72 orlando

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Posted 21 September 2008 - 03:19 PM

Espress0, have you tried Amazon?  As of a minute or so ago, they only have 2 new copies, but there's about 150 used ones.  They can't all give you responses like the above.

#73 Ned

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Posted 21 September 2008 - 04:31 PM

Right now I am in the middle of 'Running Through the Wall. Personal Encounters with the Ultramarathon'. And I am loving it! All different stories from a wide range of people who are ultra runners. Very motivating and highly recommended!

#74 AngelicOne

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Posted 21 September 2008 - 05:24 PM

Ned, "Running through the Wall" ... is that pretty much available at all good book stores?  

Or did you have to order it?

#75 Ned

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Posted 21 September 2008 - 07:37 PM

I ordered it online, haven't seen it in bookstores but that's just Hong Kong.

#76 Martin Dugdale

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Posted 22 September 2008 - 06:55 PM

I have just finished " Once A Runner" by John L Parker.
and I rather enjoyed it

Edited by Martin Dugdale, 22 September 2008 - 06:56 PM.


#77 twosheds

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Posted 23 September 2008 - 06:26 PM

Hey- I just heard on the radio that Angus &robinson ( I think it was) is bringing out a "thing" that will print out of print book s and bind them for you on the spot. Coming first in Melbourne
I thought  ( but dont quote me- i wasnt paying too much attention- but you might be able to get your book after all
two sheds

#78 twosheds

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Posted 23 September 2008 - 06:30 PM

Has anyone ever read a book called "The Lonely Breed"  It is a collection of short stories of distance athletes in the 50s and 60 s. i had a copy years ago that belonged to my father- Im not sure If I lent it to someone or if it was destroyed in our house fire in 2004.
It was awesome- also love The Perfect Mile.
Will try to get hold of Once a runner... my local bookshop is out.
two sheds

#79 Eagle

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Posted 23 September 2008 - 07:02 PM

On the wings of Mercury by Lorriane Moller.

Who you might say a NZ marathon runner who won stacks of marathons in the 80's. Olympic marthons in 1984 - 5th and 3rd in Spain in 1992. Written by her, easy to read and a close insightinto he personal life and her running. Not that easy to get although published in 2007.

#80 Bellthorpe

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Posted 23 September 2008 - 08:35 PM

This Australian supplier has three copies available.

#81 balfey

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Posted 24 September 2008 - 10:04 PM

View Postlangswm, on Aug 7 2008, 08:56 AM, said:

Extreme Running, edited by Ranulph Fiennes (amongst others)

this one was mentioned a couple of months back, but I got it for my birthday the other day (my sister sure knows what I like :rolleyes:)

For now I'll just dream of being able to run any of them, but one day... after all, the book lays out all these extreme races almost like a list. a checklist even.

#82 Espress0

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Posted 04 October 2008 - 06:26 PM

View Postorlando, on Sep 21 2008, 03:19 PM, said:

Espress0, have you tried Amazon?  As of a minute or so ago, they only have 2 new copies, but there's about 150 used ones.  They can't all give you responses like the above.
I hadn't actually as I try to shop local, but thanks for the advice, I'll check it out.

#83 tonedbutt

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Posted 15 October 2008 - 02:07 AM

Has anyone read any of John "the penguin" Bingham's books?  His website looks interesting but the Amazon links only ship to US.

Also would like to hear about "ChiRunning" by Danny Dreyer if anyone has read it.  Thanks.

#84 Linkspurr

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Posted 15 October 2008 - 07:04 AM

View Posttonedbutt, on Oct 15 2008, 02:07 AM, said:

Has anyone read any of John "the penguin" Bingham's books?  His website looks interesting but the Amazon links only ship to US.

Also would like to hear about "ChiRunning" by Danny Dreyer if anyone has read it.  Thanks.

I've read the Courage to Start by John Bingham and it was fantastic - explained so clearly why running is a big part of my life now...  Keep leaving it out for my husband to read so he can understand the new me.  I got my copy from Betterworld Books - http://www.betterworld.com.  Highly recommended!

Also Chi Running was the first running book I bought and its also a good read.  I constantly refer back to it for practical advice.  Also well worth a read.

#85 nando

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Posted 15 October 2008 - 08:41 AM

Just started reading "Barefoot Runner, the life of marathon champion Abebe Bikila".  Only a few chapters into it but is certainly a good read.

#86 Blue Dog

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Posted 15 October 2008 - 10:35 AM

Currently I am absorbed with a present I received from another runner for my recent 50th birthday -

"The Pro Wrestling Hall of Fame - The Heels" by Greg Oliver and Steven Johnson. It's an engrossing read, with great insight into all the 'baddies' of pro wrestling, full of heartwarming golden moments like this little excerpt on the infamous 'Killer Kowalski'-

                     ************************************************************
"Kowalski's career will be forever intertwined with another incredible physical specimen - Yukon Eric."

"In January 1953 they were paired for the first TV broadcast of wrestling in Canada. Then, a year later in the Montreal Forum, came wrestling's most famous knee drop."

Kowalski leaped from the top turnbuckle onto Yukon Eric, whose leg was tied in the ropes. Eric tried to turn his head, but Kowalski's shin bone grazed his cheek and ripped off his foe's cauliflower ear. Referee Sammy Mack picked up the ear, but since Yukon Eric couldn't continue, Kowalski was the victor."

"Two days later, Kowalski visited his victim in hospital, and seeing him bandaged up like Humpty Dumpty, started laughing. The press caught the exchange, and dubbed him 'Killer'."

                    ***************************************************************

Presumably the referee still has the ear as a keepsake, and people had to speak up when talking to Yukon Eric.

The book is a fascinating account of those wonderful times when life and things in general were much more simple. Apparently, if you offended someone, or someone offended you, you just put on a pair of tights and whacked them in the head with a fold-up steel chair.

I'm finding it tremendously motivational.

Cheers, Blue Dog.  :)

Edited by Blue Dog, 15 October 2008 - 11:14 AM.


#87 sunny1

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Posted 15 October 2008 - 10:57 AM

Currently reading Brisingr. Lots of ultra running in it.  :)



(Most of you would probably dismiss it as geeky, fantasy, science-fiction stuff. Recommended by my 14 year old. I was impressed with a running segment early in the book. 14 year old says 'mum wait till later in the book ... there is a huge running section later'! Gem of a 14 year old!)

#88 tonedbutt

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Posted 16 October 2008 - 12:05 AM

View PostLinkspurr, on Oct 15 2008, 08:04 AM, said:

I've read the Courage to Start by John Bingham and it was fantastic - explained so clearly why running is a big part of my life now...  Keep leaving it out for my husband to read so he can understand the new me.  I got my copy from Betterworld Books - http://www.betterworld.com.  Highly recommended!

Also Chi Running was the first running book I bought and its also a good read.  I constantly refer back to it for practical advice.  Also well worth a read.
Thanks so much for that Linkspurr.  I am a bit of a book addict but am trying to rein myself in by only buying really good things that are worthwhile.  I will check them out.

#89 Eagle

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Posted 16 October 2008 - 06:40 AM

A great read about a great Australain runner who seemed to loose his way after THE RACE bit seemed to get it back and then suddenely died. The Peter Norman story A RACE TO REMEMBER here :

A Race to Remember

#90 cakeboy

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Posted 16 October 2008 - 01:29 PM

Just finished Dean Karnazes book "50 marathons in 50 days".   The guy is a machine. Some really good tales in there but also lots of chaff.....As a father of 3 I'm not buying the whole "greatest dad in the world" tripe that is delivered on occasions. Not going to spoil the story but after the 50th marathon you'd think there would be some serious doghouse duties to attend to.....but wait ....there's more....

Ultra runners will be grimacing at times...at other times as jealious as hell...he's no running freak in terms of the speed he runs... but his ability to recovery is freakish.....

If you are interested in the marathon, it's worth a read...... lots of good tips for first timers
cheers Cakeboy

Edited by cakeboy, 16 October 2008 - 01:32 PM.


#91 julz83

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Posted 16 October 2008 - 02:00 PM

i just got given haruki murakami's book for my birthday. he is one of my favourite authors and i cant wait to start reading it. i wouldve started it already but i know with his books once i pick one up i cant put it down and ive got some uni work that takes precedence at the moment.
good to read some of the reviews of the book, looking forward to making up my own mind about it.

#92 chookrunner

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Posted 16 October 2008 - 02:25 PM

View Postjulz83, on Oct 15 2008, 11:00 PM, said:

i just got given haruki murakami's book for my birthday. he is one of my favourite authors and i cant wait to start reading it. i wouldve started it already but i know with his books once i pick one up i cant put it down and ive got some uni work that takes precedence at the moment.
good to read some of the reviews of the book, looking forward to making up my own mind about it.

Is that book available locally Julz ?

#93 julz83

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Posted 16 October 2008 - 02:39 PM

i think so. my dad sent it over from perth and i cant really see him going to the trouble of ordering it on-line. pretty sure i spotted it in borders not that long ago.

#94 slowmo

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Posted 16 October 2008 - 03:40 PM

I recently found this in my local library...

Think Fast: Mental Toughness Training for Runners
Joe Henderson (1991)
Plume, ISBN 0-452-26610-6

Yeah, yeah... I know the idea of me reading a book with 'Fast' and 'Toughness' in the title is pretty funny.

The title is a bit of misnomer in some respects - or perhaps it's just that it made me expect a lot of "go hard or go home" sentiments.  But Henderson is interested in all the ways in which you might define mental toughness for running: e.g. Derek Clayton was certainly tough to maintain his extraordinary weekly mileages during his competitive career, but then he displayed a different but equally impressive form of mental and emotional strength when, later on, he returned to running for pleasure.  

I enjoyed the discussion about distance, performance and injury risk.  Henderson is a supporter of the idea that many elite athletes perform better when their training load is reduced, even if my injury as with Mary Decker.  On the other hand, he is honest about the fact that others disagree with this view and cite contrasting examples.

Most of all, I enjoyed his emphasis on life-long running and the various ways in which you might come to terms with the end of your PB period and the inevitable decrease in pace.  This isn't a bleak picture in Henderson's terms - it's just another stage of running with its own challenges and pleasures to be enjoyed.

A good read.

slowmo

#95 slowmc

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Posted 16 October 2008 - 07:36 PM

Hi,some great titles have been listed on this thread and I'm just adding three more for your consideration.They are all great read's for different reasons and all highly recommmended.

1)Kenny Moore- Best Efforts:World Class Runners and Races (1982). This is a collection of profiles on athletes such as Bill Rogers, Ron Clarke, Steve Prefontaine, Seb Coe etc that were published I think previously in Sports Illustrated. Moore writes with great understanding and empathy. He was a world class marathoner who represented the USA in the Marathon at the 1968 & 1972 Olympics.
This book remains one of the finest books ever published on athletics,period. Sadly, it's hard to get hold of, 2nd hand copies are not cheap, but if you can find a copy I urge you to do so.

2)Tom Jordan- Pre:The Story of America's Greatest Running Legend:Steve Prefontaine(1997) 2nd ed. A good introduction to Pre's life and times by someone who has a good knowledge of Pre and the environment he ran in in the US  in the early 70's. Some great photo's and good insights. Should be read in conjunction with Kenny Moore's biography on Bill Bowerman where Moore has some additional insights on Pre  from a different perspective. Nevertheless a good introduction to the life of a runner who has become almost mythical in US running circles, yet whose story remains fresh today. Still in print, and not overly expensive despite the falling Aust dollar.

3)Pat Butcher- The Perfect Distance:Ovett & Coe:The Record Breaking Rivalry (2004) What can I say.Will remain the definitive account of an unforgettable period in British athletics history. A wonderful account of a period in middle distance running that remains extraordinary even in retrospect, over twenty years later. Butcher's account is interesting,never dull and with fresh insights into both Ovett and Coe's athletic career's, which after all this time have much to admire. Butcher covers many of the controversial aspects of their careers fairly and it is an easy read . A classic. Still in print, so you can still order it in from a good bookseller, and it shouldn't cost much. Regardless ,do yourself a favour and grab hold of a copy , even if it is to relive such great memories. Well worth it.

Kind Regards

slowmc

#96 tomh

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Posted 17 October 2008 - 07:37 AM

Does anyone know of running books sold in electronic format? eg PDF
Specifically I'd love to buy Lore of Running, but hate big books. I buy all my technical(work) ones as PDF, but haven't had any luck with non-technical ones yet. I emailed the Australian distributor but I don't think they really knew.

Tom.

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Posted 17 October 2008 - 08:35 AM

View Posttomh, on Oct 17 2008, 08:37 AM, said:

Does anyone know of running books sold in electronic format? eg PDF
There are a couple mentioned here and some other categories of books that might be relevant...
http://sportsebooks....Running-eBooks/

Probably if you google for ebook and running you will ferret out anything available

slowmo

#98 tomh

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Posted 17 October 2008 - 10:45 AM

View Postslowmo, on Oct 17 2008, 09:35 AM, said:

There are a couple mentioned here and some other categories of books that might be relevant...
http://sportsebooks....Running-eBooks/

Probably if you google for ebook and running you will ferret out anything available

slowmo

Much appreciated slowmo.

#99 chilliman

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Posted 18 October 2008 - 12:04 PM

View PostBlue Dog, on Oct 15 2008, 11:35 AM, said:

Currently I am absorbed with a present I received from another runner for my recent 50th birthday -

"The Pro Wrestling Hall of Fame - The Heels" by Greg Oliver and Steven Johnson. It's an engrossing read, with great insight into all the 'baddies' of pro wrestling, full of heartwarming golden moments like this little excerpt on the infamous 'Killer Kowalski'-

..........

The book is a fascinating account of those wonderful times when life and things in general were much more simple. Apparently, if you offended someone, or someone offended you, you just put on a pair of tights and whacked them in the head with a fold-up steel chair.

I'm finding it tremendously motivational.

Cheers, Blue Dog.  :)


My sports mad grandfather still used to refer to "Killer" in the old days as a girlie actor, and that's when I reckon they were fair dinkum.

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Posted 11 January 2009 - 03:21 PM

suckers