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Motivation And Coaching


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#1 loves2run

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Posted 02 March 2011 - 10:25 AM

Hi,

As a fitness instructor I am always looking for books and tools to help me become a better motivator.  I'm on the prowl for any reading material that can help me find better ways of motivating people rather than spitting out monotonous words like, "come on, you can do it!"...

Any recommendations?  Doesn't have to directly relate to sport.  Maybe even general psychology theories will help me improve.
Cheers

L2R

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#2 iRonnie

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Posted 07 March 2011 - 04:18 PM

http://catalogue.nla.../Record/1773254


http://www.wow4u.com...otes/index.html


Dr Waitley also has written  a book.  The Psychology of Winning.  More extensive list of DW's quotes below.


http://www.brainyquo...is_waitley.html


Psychology by David A Myers is an introductory text that Uni psych. students often use to understand the basics. .  

I like it when I hear inpsiring stories.  When you are chatting before or after a workout, you could tell a few yarns that are relevant to the person you are coaching.  Just  tell a yarn that helps them focus or feel more mentally energised and engaged in the session..  A non-didactic lesson :rolleyes: .   So keep an eye out in the papers, magazines or novels. Often your own history has many fun times and achievements that might assist others improve their fitness and attitude.  

I don't really know.  But, I think, establishing at the outset  clear goals and understanding what your charges expect from you is important. ( It is that individuality thing again.)  Then all you have to do is let them know they are on track to achieve what they want.

Edited by iRonnie, 07 March 2011 - 05:10 PM.


#3 DontStop

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Posted 07 March 2011 - 05:06 PM

Depends on what you mean by motivation.

If the person you're coaching is self-motivated, then what they're looking for from their coach is pretty much the stuff ronnie said: quality feedback on progress, goal-oriented  input, and maybe the odd kick up the arse if they're dragging the chain a bit. Often it's just as much about holding them back when they're meant to be doing it easy, as it is putting a rocket up them.

If they don't have that kind of self-motivation, then frankly I have no idea. I'd make a terrible coach of anyone who had to be 'motivated' to push themselves. Guess it depends on why they need external motivation.

If it's because they think they're not good/fast/strong enough to do it, then you'd be looking to remind them of how work to date has achieved results, and focus on their strengths and gains, and making them feel good about that. Hopefully they put 2 and 2 together.

If it's because because they're just lazy, well... nah, wouldn't have a clue. I guess just making it enjoyable, so it's not like work at all.

I've always found that 'rah rah' motivation works for a few minutes, but isn't ever going to change people properly. But if it's just to get a bunch of half-motivated people through a single session, then I guess that biggest loser shouty trainer thing may work?

#4 HillsAths1

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Posted 08 March 2011 - 01:27 PM

Loves2Run, some interesting points have been made.

When you do find the information, you need to be aware that what someone will find motivational, others may think that it is crap.

Each person responds to the different environment/motivational factors in a different way. Having coached for a number of years, some people respond to particular methods, others go into their shell if you say something a particular way.

I have not started calling any of my runners, Ninja Warriors, but you never know!