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How To Run Faster 10 - 15 Km?


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#1 Eternaloptimist

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Posted 13 November 2011 - 11:39 AM

Hello wise and experienced runners!
I only started running 20 months ago after never running before i.e. no previous endurance base whatsoever. I am 39, 6'2'' and 84kg without much fat!
I finished the Melbourne Half marathon in 2:20 - with a bad cold.... :( Have run the distance in 2:14 before.
I can run 10 km in around 57 min - but am wrecked. Best 5km is 26 min.
I run with a Garmin 305.
My problem is that I don't seem to have much of an endurance base to speak of.
Reading widely, there is lots of advice re "base building".
If I aim to run 10 km with HR under 150 bpm I have to run around 8.8 - 9 kph average... uncomfortably slow and mind-numbing (but if it is what I have to do to get faster I will).  Max HR is around 188 bpm.
If I were to try and keep HR under 140 bpm I would be walking!
I would like to get faster in the 10 - 15 km range - lots of fun runs in this distance and I enjoy 10 - 12 km runs.
I am really not sure what to do.
I actually really like running around 11 - 12 kph (up on forefoot, nice stride length etc) but can't sustain this for more than around 5 - 6 kms....
Also, I run every 2nd day, much more would be difficult. At the moment as an interim plan, I have set out to run lots of slow runs with HR sitting in the mid 140s with the aim of building a base. Every 4th run, I have been doing an interval run / Fartlek so I don't go absolutely out of my mind given how slow I have to run to keep the HR down.
Any advice would be much appreciated!

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#2 MikeLikeRun

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Posted 14 November 2011 - 11:09 AM

Is running more than every second day difficult due to time constraints?  Or because your body can't cope with it?

Running slow for base building is done so you can get a higher volume in which gives you more benefit for endurance.  If you can't run every day due to time constraints then you are not getting the benefit of higher volume from slow running so you may as well up the intensity to whatever you can handle with more interval/fartlek, and tempo - slow 10 minutes, medium 20 minutes, slow 10 minutes.  

If your body is having trouble then try and slowly increase your total volume, no faster than 10% a week is reccommended, but personally this was too much and I did more like 10% a month.  Go from 3 to 4 to 5 runs a week by shortening your running distance to maintain weekly total at the same level, and then gradually increasing the length of each run again.

#3 Eternaloptimist

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Posted 15 November 2011 - 09:28 PM

Thanks Mike for the comments.
2nd daily running because of a combination of time constraints (am a regional paediatrician doing a lot of on-call when running is limited to treadmill only in case I get called in...) and some residual creakiness after the too rapidly increased kms in the leadup to the recent Melbourne Half - should have attempted this next year, but my wife and friend were running....
I will pay more attention to the total kms - your suggestion sounds very sensible.
Would you mind elaborating a bit more on the interval / fartleks?
One of the reasons I use a HR monitor is that I have never been running fit so have no "feel" for how I should feel at a given work rate.... As a result, for the first 12 months every run was until exhaustion (collapsing over the boot of the car!) and HR in the 180s which increased speed but not really endurance... :(  Also, not sustainable mentally, I think, in the long term - which is the plan.
Have just looked at km in the last few weeks - averaging around 35 kms without too much creakiness!!
Cheers,

#4 UnfitnessFanatic

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Posted 16 November 2011 - 08:14 AM

Eternaloptimist chuck the watch and heart rate monitor in the draw and head out for at least one run a week where you don't puff, could hold a conversation and feel like you could run forever at that pace.  Start off at 10-12 km and slowly build up to 18-20km.  This will help your endurance and also be a very enjoyable run.  If you can run with someone else do that, it makes it seem like no effort at all if you have someone to talk to along the way.

Look for some different speed sessions on here that you can do, mix it up every week.  400's, 800's, 1k, 1.5k etc there are heaps of sets incorporating distances or even timed reps as well.  If you can try and find a squad you can join.  It makes speed sessions a lot easier if you have people to work off rather than trying to do them alone.

Edited by UnfitnessFanatic, 16 November 2011 - 08:19 AM.


#5 walker1st

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Posted 16 November 2011 - 11:49 AM

Mike did hit the nail

slow enough run should allow everyday running and later on running 2x per day

even if it is only for 30 mins each time.

forget kms and forget km/h

initail goel could be 7H running per week and later aim for 10-14 hours total per week

regardless how you put them together from small chunks, but make sure initialy no session is longer than 90 mins

#6 Flukey

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Posted 16 November 2011 - 02:19 PM

I have the same issues as the OP, my speed and endurance just aren't improving. I am 47 and fittish but slow and in the City2Sea was in the slowest 20% for my demographic.

So based on the above post, the recommendation is to run every day, for about 1 hour, and run at whatever pace is comfortable.
I should not be concerned with how fast or how far I go in that time. Is that correct?

And then increase that that to 90 minute runs if I feel I am up to it?

This will build the endurance. Will speed naturally improve as well?

#7 MikeLikeRun

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Posted 16 November 2011 - 02:43 PM

View PostEternaloptimist, on 15 November 2011 - 09:28 PM, said:

Would you mind elaborating a bit more on the interval / fartleks?
Whatever intervals seem fun.  Using a variety of lengths, and using hills as well.  Walk recover, stand recover, or jog recover.  The main point is that running at different speeds gives different training benefits.

Or start with something like McMillan's advice and try and get more scientific.  

http://www.mcmillanr...Pages/article/3

#8 Tony123

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Posted 16 November 2011 - 02:53 PM

View PostFlukey, on 16 November 2011 - 02:19 PM, said:

I have the same issues as the OP, my speed and endurance just aren't improving. I am 47 and fittish but slow and in the City2Sea was in the slowest 20% for my demographic.

So based on the above post, the recommendation is to run every day, for about 1 hour, and run at whatever pace is comfortable.
I should not be concerned with how fast or how far I go in that time. Is that correct?

And then increase that that to 90 minute runs if I feel I am up to it?

This will build the endurance. Will speed naturally improve as well?

As you run more you will get fitter and stronger, so both speed and endurance will improve.

#9 Tony123

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Posted 16 November 2011 - 03:07 PM

View PostTony123, on 16 November 2011 - 02:53 PM, said:

As you run more you will get fitter and stronger, so both speed and endurance will improve.

Probably should add to this.  It depends on what speed you are talking about, if you want to improve your 400m time then running long, slow miles will not help much.  But long, slow miles will help your speed for races 10km and above.

The speed will only improve to a certain point though, so adding in reps, intervals, fartlek sessions will help the speed.

Speed sessions also give some variety to your running, it can get quite boring if you are just out running slow miles all the time.

Consistent running over a long period of time will improve your speed and endurance

Edited by Tony123, 16 November 2011 - 03:07 PM.


#10 Flukey

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Posted 16 November 2011 - 04:29 PM

I am only concerned with 10k and up.
Thanks for the input guys.