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Paralympics 2012Discussion, Questions, Answers, Observations and stuff


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#1 rohan

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Posted 30 August 2012 - 04:43 PM

Can someone tell me about helmet rules for wheelchair racing?
In TV footage they seem to wear helmets, but I've seen a lot of photos with racers not using helmets.

Anyway the question is why have the helmets?
Roughly speaking they travel at the same speed as runners... who don't wear helmets and whose head can fall to the ground from a greater height.  If it's the hard objects of the chairs being involved in the race then what about hurdle races at the Olympics?
There's a bunch of people running pretty fast with the ability to have significant stacks, yet you don't see Sally wearing a helmet, in a sport with a similar, if not greater danger rating.

Anyone enlighten me?

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#2 tonedbutt

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Posted 31 August 2012 - 03:01 AM

Afraid not but that brings me to another point.  Did you see the woman in the wheelchair that was suspended above the arena during the opening ceremony?  SHE wasn't wearing a helmet and I would have thought that anyone working at heights had to have one.

#3 tonedbutt

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Posted 31 August 2012 - 05:37 AM

These wheelchair basketballers seem to fall over quite a bit and they don't wear helmets.

#4 ChrisMac

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Posted 31 August 2012 - 10:52 AM

I heard a BBC commentator putting the helmet question to the Canadian wheelchair rugby captain.  He answered to the effect that none of them got into a wheelchair from library-related accidents; they enjoy playing hard and don't like to be mollycoddled.  And who is going to deny them that?  I loved the way he talked up his sport "Imagine rugby with the fear of becoming a paraplegic removed - that's how we play!"

#5 Paul Every

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Posted 31 August 2012 - 11:18 AM

View Posttonedbutt, on 31 August 2012 - 03:01 AM, said:

Afraid not but that brings me to another point.  Did you see the woman in the wheelchair that was suspended above the arena during the opening ceremony?  SHE wasn't wearing a helmet and I would have thought that anyone working at heights had to have one.

Not sure that a helmet is a requirement for working at heights per se.

I've had couple of jobs which involved working at heights and a helmet/hard hat hasn't been a OH&S requirement.

I think helmets/hard hats are more commonly required in jobs where falling objects present a danger, such as construction work and tree lopping.

#6 tonedbutt

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Posted 31 August 2012 - 11:55 AM

You know what they say Paul, if you don't need a head, you don't need a helmet. :Silly:

#7 NKOTB

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Posted 01 September 2012 - 10:31 AM

Is being  vision impaired means you run slower. My initial thought is NO.

#8 KiaKaha

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Posted 01 September 2012 - 11:49 AM

Only time my vision affairs how fast I run is if I'm running alone because I can't always make out whats on the path ahead. If your running with a guide you trust it didn't affect you when I run with tiger boy I'm heaps faster coz I know I can trust him not to let me trip. Getting lust is a while other subject lol.



. Not sure shit the helmet thing

but didn't we have nikki suspended in the stadium at sydney with no helmet.

Do able bodied rugby players wear helmets.

Maybe in the wheel chair races its because of the chairs I wouldn't want one running over my head.



#9 Gadfly

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Posted 01 September 2012 - 08:39 PM

Just watching some of the running:  100m womens heats and the mens 200m final.  OMG - they can run . The WR beaten in 4 heats (I think) of the womens 100m.......and how good are the guide runners to pull up like that at the very last minute.  WOW!   The mens 200m final of above knee amputee was just amazing to watch - the different style and technology...even on the start blocks.....but I never would have picked the GB runner to end up in front - it didn't look like a 'fast' stride - how wrong was I!  (don't want to start off a technical thread or conversation on the how and why - just observation and amazement).

Keep it coming - this is awesome to watch.

:)

#10 captainjack

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Posted 02 September 2012 - 12:16 PM

Do paralympics have the same drug testing as olympics? ..not suggesting anything....just wondering

Paralympians I think will soon be faster, higher, stronger than olympians...bionic olympics.

Edited by captainjack, 02 September 2012 - 12:19 PM.


#11 Jimboy

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Posted 03 September 2012 - 11:36 AM

I am really enjoying watching all the Paralympic sports which the ABC are doing a magnificent job of showing in both real time and highlights format.
Just a few comments.
It is difficult to fully understand the different disability ranges in which these world class athletes compete. Our ignorance I suppose, and  we have to accept the experts opinions,just as the athletes seem to do.
One is amazed by the talent and mental drive of these athletes,some of our able bodied ones might need to have a look at themselves in this regard.No excuses just straight out answers to explain their performances when interviewed.
Also,these particular Australian  athletes seem in the main to have peaked perfectly for these Paralympic Games, a tribute to their coachs and a stark difference to some of the able bodied Olympians.
Bloody fantastic is all I can say.

#12 whatsinthebox

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Posted 03 September 2012 - 12:59 PM

Oscar Pistorius is complaining about people getting an unfair advantage from their prosthetics  :LMAO:

http://www.bbc.co.uk...-sport/19460868

#13 danish

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Posted 03 September 2012 - 01:14 PM

"Alan's a great athlete he's always been up there among the top. I  think he's a terrific guy and a terrific athlete but he's never run a 21 second race and I don't think he's a 21 second athlete."

http://www.smh.com.a...0903-25908.html


Neither is Pistorius without the technological advancements they've made for his blades over the years.

#14 ChrisMac

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Posted 03 September 2012 - 03:42 PM

View Postcaptainjack, on 02 September 2012 - 12:16 PM, said:

Do paralympics have the same drug testing as olympics? ..not suggesting anything....just wondering

Paralympians I think will soon be faster, higher, stronger than olympians...bionic olympics.
14 paralympians were caught doping in Sydney.  Boosting is the more common approach used by spinal cord injured competitors, where they deliberately injure themselves to increase blood pressure.  The firstoffthebike boys did a piece on it last week on their podcast.  Sounds very painful, but I can't see how it could be policed.

#15 halfwaydown

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Posted 03 September 2012 - 05:28 PM

View PostChrisMac, on 03 September 2012 - 03:42 PM, said:

View Postcaptainjack, on 02 September 2012 - 12:16 PM, said:

Do paralympics have the same drug testing as olympics? ..not suggesting anything....just wondering

Paralympians I think will soon be faster, higher, stronger than olympians...bionic olympics.
14 paralympians were caught doping in Sydney.  Boosting is the more common approach used by spinal cord injured competitors, where they deliberately injure themselves to increase blood pressure.  The firstoffthebike boys did a piece on it last week on their podcast.  Sounds very painful, but I can't see how it could be policed.
Boosting is supposedly pretty difficult to police.  Simply put, paralympics with spinal damage often cannot easily boost their energy levels and get their adrenalin going because they are not activiating their limbs like other athletes can.  This can put them at a considerable disadvantage.  Adrenalin will increase performance considerably so you need to trick your body into stress and to get around this you can try deliberately injuring yourself - this is a dangerous thing to do as it is seldom painful as the athletes will tend to injure the limbs they cannot feel anymore.  But a simpler and more common and less dangerous way to boost is to not empty the bladder which has a similar effect at rasing adrenalin as it stresses the body  - as many of these athletes are on cafitas (sorry can't spell) - this is easy to do and difficult to monitor.
The podcast I listened on it suggested about 13% of such athletes at a recent competiton admitted some level of boosting.

Personally I wouldn't put it in the same bracket as drug taking.  Adrenalin is a natural drug, unfortunately for these athletes due to their condition, they don't have ready access to something everyone else is tapping into.

#16 clanrunner

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Posted 03 September 2012 - 05:35 PM

A bit of confusion with the results in the F35/36 women's discus, the results being revised after the medal ceremony and all medals re-awarded. Good news for Kath Proudfoot (and Australia) as it elevated her result to a bronze medal, but it this a common occurrence? I'd have thought at this level that the scorers should know what they were doing! Feel sorry for the girl who originally was awarded gold, had her national anthem played but had to return it and accept silver. She won gold in the shot put so I guess that makes up for it somewhat, but still, surely this type of mistake shouldn't happen at international level!

#17 vat

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Posted 03 September 2012 - 08:48 PM

View Postrohan, on 30 August 2012 - 04:43 PM, said:

Anyway the question is why have the helmets?
Roughly speaking they travel at the same speed as runners...

The wheelie record for the 5k is under 9:54, vs 12:37 for able bodied, so they're capable of averaging 30km/h for that distance.

The sole wheelie rider at the Bridge to Brisbane mentioned he was likely to crack 60 km/h on the downhill of the Gateway.

So, yeah, the speeds are a bit different.  The guys are also strapped into their kit (doesn't seem quite right to call them chairs!), so there is the potential for the chair to fall on top of them.

#18 trailpuddin

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Posted 03 September 2012 - 08:49 PM

The ability of these elite athletes to back up is incredible. It makes many of the 'able' bodied olypmians look like tulips.

#19 captainjack

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Posted 03 September 2012 - 09:53 PM

View PostJimboy, on 03 September 2012 - 11:36 AM, said:

One is amazed by the talent and mental drive of these athletes,some of our able bodied ones might need to have a look at themselves in this regard.No excuses just straight out answers to explain their performances when interviewed.
I am most impressed the drive and determination of people Ive never heard of - not household names but really should be as rolemodels.

Very impressed with Kurt Fearnley post-interview when he said he was very happy with silver because he gave it everything and had absolutely nothing left in the tank.

Edited by captainjack, 03 September 2012 - 09:54 PM.


#20 Gadfly

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Posted 03 September 2012 - 10:22 PM

I have noticed in the interviews and comments I have seen with and from the Australian team, how often the athletes talk about the team as a whole and being there to support each other - it's not all me me me!   They are amazing athletes and they are all giving it their all and are excited for everyone's efforts and success.  

A lot to be learned from them....  and yes, how they back up race after race is incredible.  

Great stuff!!!  :yahoo:

.......and just quietly, think the situation that Oscar Pistorius now finds himself with silver........priceless! (sorry, not very sporting of me... :Smug: )

Edited by Gadfly, 03 September 2012 - 10:24 PM.


#21 trailpuddin

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Posted 04 September 2012 - 06:18 AM

Brad Carroll interview after the 1500m - absolutely brilliant - big dose of the good stuff.

#22 tonedbutt

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Posted 05 September 2012 - 01:22 AM

View Posthalfwaydown, on 03 September 2012 - 05:28 PM, said:

View PostChrisMac, on 03 September 2012 - 03:42 PM, said:

View Postcaptainjack, on 02 September 2012 - 12:16 PM, said:

Do paralympics have the same drug testing as olympics? ..not suggesting anything....just wondering

Paralympians I think will soon be faster, higher, stronger than olympians...bionic olympics.
14 paralympians were caught doping in Sydney.  Boosting is the more common approach used by spinal cord injured competitors, where they deliberately injure themselves to increase blood pressure.  The firstoffthebike boys did a piece on it last week on their podcast.  Sounds very painful, but I can't see how it could be policed.
Boosting is supposedly pretty difficult to police.  Simply put, paralympics with spinal damage often cannot easily boost their energy levels and get their adrenalin going because they are not activiating their limbs like other athletes can.  This can put them at a considerable disadvantage.  Adrenalin will increase performance considerably so you need to trick your body into stress and to get around this you can try deliberately injuring yourself - this is a dangerous thing to do as it is seldom painful as the athletes will tend to injure the limbs they cannot feel anymore.  But a simpler and more common and less dangerous way to boost is to not empty the bladder which has a similar effect at rasing adrenalin as it stresses the body  - as many of these athletes are on cafitas (sorry can't spell) - this is easy to do and difficult to monitor.
The podcast I listened on it suggested about 13% of such athletes at a recent competiton admitted some level of boosting.

Personally I wouldn't put it in the same bracket as drug taking.  Adrenalin is a natural drug, unfortunately for these athletes due to their condition, they don't have ready access to something everyone else is tapping into.

"Cafitas" is spelled "catheters".  :)   You could do a bladder scan on the athletes very easily and non-invasively and if their catheter was clamped, simply release it.

#23 captainjack

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Posted 05 September 2012 - 09:06 PM

Jacqueline Freney.....sixth gold medal.........superstar

Brenden Hall.........superstar

James Magnussen..........ho hum



Liked Kurt Furnleys no sugurcoating honesty ("it was shit") when things were not panning out.

Also liked the 1500m won by the Kenyan.

#24 Jimboy

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Posted 06 September 2012 - 01:48 PM

Agree on Freney and Hall whilst Fearnley was, as always, a down to earth champion athlete who gives his all and no excuses.
Bit hard to query Magnussen's attitude as I think the bloke appears to be a "confidence" type athlete who was built up as a certainty
by some of the media.After his initial and understandable disappointment I thought he handled himself pretty well.
Must say that I am enjoying the Paralympics more than I did the Warm Up Games. :Cry:

#25 whatsinthebox

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Posted 06 September 2012 - 02:18 PM

watched Ahmed Kelly (an Aussie with double arm and leg deficiences) swim.
mind = blown

also tv coverage is far superior to the job channel 9 did.

#26 HillsAths1

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Posted 07 September 2012 - 01:57 PM

Did anyone see the blind 5 a side soccer last night?

Blind Chinese soccer players have some great ball control.

#27 Jimboy

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Posted 09 September 2012 - 03:10 PM

One of the greatly awaited Paralympic races tonight.The T54 Men/Women Marathon around the streets of London.
Australia is represented in the Womens event by Christie Dawes,a Newcastle lass, while in the mens event "veteran" Kurt Fearnley( another Novocastrian champion) and 18 yr old South Australian Nathenial Arkley compete against the world best,notably the British lad David Weir.The latter may be a little flat from his multi wins on the track,certainly he will have to be at his best to get past a determined Aussie champion.
Race starts 8.30pm AEST,good luck to them all and let us hope that ABC gives us plenty of live coverage of it.

#28 whatsinthebox

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Posted 09 September 2012 - 09:06 PM

View PostJimboy, on 09 September 2012 - 03:10 PM, said:

Race starts 8.30pm AEST,good luck to them all and let us hope that ABC gives us plenty of live coverage of it.

read this and turned on the telly immediately.

swimming highlights :Sigh:

#29 Jimboy

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Posted 10 September 2012 - 11:05 AM

View Postwhatsinthebox, on 09 September 2012 - 09:06 PM, said:

View PostJimboy, on 09 September 2012 - 03:10 PM, said:

Race starts 8.30pm AEST,good luck to them all and let us hope that ABC gives us plenty of live coverage of it.

read this and turned on the telly immediately.

swimming highlights :Sigh:

Yes,I was disappointed to see the little coverage of the race that was shown,not sure if it was an ABC decision to show so little.
It was not explained very well by the lady in charge of the talking heads panel.
At least we got to see the finish of the mens race,another great victory to th British athlete David Weir.A top run by Kurt Fearnley to get a bronze to go with his two previous Olympic Golds in this event.
He did himself and Australia proud.
Now that it is all over let us give all ourParalympians the welcome home they deserve.Looking forward to cheering them in a Sydney parade,how about it,Mr O'Farrell?

#30 cjr

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Posted 10 September 2012 - 11:43 AM

View PostJimboy, on 10 September 2012 - 11:05 AM, said:

View Postwhatsinthebox, on 09 September 2012 - 09:06 PM, said:

View PostJimboy, on 09 September 2012 - 03:10 PM, said:

Race starts 8.30pm AEST,good luck to them all and let us hope that ABC gives us plenty of live coverage of it.

read this and turned on the telly immediately.

swimming highlights :Sigh:

Yes,I was disappointed to see the little coverage of the race that was shown,not sure if it was an ABC decision to show so little.
It was not explained very well by the lady in charge of the talking heads panel.


I read somewhere that the BBC didn't cover it as it would have cost too much to have all the crews out on the road - caused a bit of a stink in the UK as well

#31 KiaKaha

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Posted 10 September 2012 - 11:46 AM

Did they have a impaired marathon. I know they don't for women but always have for men.

#32 ChrisMac

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Posted 11 September 2012 - 09:24 AM

View PostKiaKaha, on 10 September 2012 - 11:46 AM, said:

Did they have a impaired marathon. I know they don't for women but always have for men.
Yes, the T12 Marathon, men only.  Won by Spain.  No Aussies this time.

#33 KiaKaha

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Posted 11 September 2012 - 12:11 PM

Thats why I couldn't find any info on the aussie. We have had some amazing blind marathon runners in past hopefully we will again.

There were a couple of guys in adelaide I done with that were good runners but it was just so hard to find training partners. The blind society tended to push blind sports. They used to do a lot more athletics.

#34 Ali1977

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Posted 11 September 2012 - 01:31 PM

View PostPaul Every, on 31 August 2012 - 11:18 AM, said:

View Posttonedbutt, on 31 August 2012 - 03:01 AM, said:

Afraid not but that brings me to another point.  Did you see the woman in the wheelchair that was suspended above the arena during the opening ceremony?  SHE wasn't wearing a helmet and I would have thought that anyone working at heights had to have one.

Not sure that a helmet is a requirement for working at heights per se.

I've had couple of jobs which involved working at heights and a helmet/hard hat hasn't been a OH&S requirement.

I think helmets/hard hats are more commonly required in jobs where falling objects present a danger, such as construction work and tree lopping.

.......or for anyone directly under the suspended woman in the wheelchair..............

#35 maristrider

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Posted 03 June 2013 - 04:33 PM

View PostGadfly, on 01 September 2012 - 08:39 PM, said:

The mens 200m final of above knee amputee was just amazing to watch - the different style and technology...even on the start blocks.....but I never would have picked the GB runner to end up in front - it didn't look like a 'fast' stride - how wrong was I!

Richard Whitehead (GB runner who won T42 200m) has a marathon PB of 2:42.52. He only started sprinting because T42s can't run in the Paralympic marathon - once he did, he fairly quickly broke the 200m WR in his classification. http://www.marathonchamp.com/

His latest project - running the length of GB for charity: http://richardwhiteh...unsbritain.com/

Edited by maristrider, 03 June 2013 - 06:46 PM.





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