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Best way to lose weight


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Poll: Best way to lose weight (19 member(s) have cast votes)

Best way to lose weight

  1. Calorie Counting (CalorieKing, Myfitness Pal, other) (6 votes [31.58%])

    Percentage of vote: 31.58%

  2. Weight Watchers (2 votes [10.53%])

    Percentage of vote: 10.53%

  3. Intuitive Eating/Mindful Eating/ Appetite awareness (2 votes [10.53%])

    Percentage of vote: 10.53%

  4. Meal replacements (shakes) (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  5. Jenny Craig/ Lite and Easy (meal packages provided) (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  6. Paleo (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  7. Low/Lower Carb (Zone, Aitkins, CSIRO) (1 votes [5.26%])

    Percentage of vote: 5.26%

  8. Australian Healthy Eating Guidelines (aka MyPlate, Food Pyramid) (2 votes [10.53%])

    Percentage of vote: 10.53%

  9. Other (specify in comments) (2 votes [10.53%])

    Percentage of vote: 10.53%

  10. Quit Sugar (4 votes [21.05%])

    Percentage of vote: 21.05%

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#1 richardegg

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Posted 30 July 2017 - 06:44 AM

Hi all,

Just getting people's opinion as to what they think is the most effective way to reduce and maintain bodyweight

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#2 Clockwise

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Posted 30 July 2017 - 07:44 AM

- no alcohol
- no sweets (replace with fruits)
- nothing deep fried
- nothing crumbed +fried
- eat only when you are hungry. Hungry is that nasty feeling that makes you angry - it is not the absence of full.
- get used to being hungry
- when you start eating, start with some salads (of course no mayonnaise!) or veggies to fill the volume of your stomach with something low calorie
- eat lots of veggies and salads. (whole food, plant based as much as you can stomach).
- eat slowly - it takes about 15 minutes until satiation kicks in
- eat only until hungry disappears, not until full
- I can handle being hungry better at night, because I sleep!  so I tend to have my last meal very early in the evening (and light).
- there will be days when you fail. Move on and start again the next day.
- don't use running as an excuse to eat more.
- you will run very slowly, because you lack energy.

Caveat: I have never been on a weight loss journey of more than 8 kg and I was pretty good at putting most of it back on within a year.

#3 Davo

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Posted 30 July 2017 - 09:20 AM

Four simple words:
Eat less, exercise more.
Unfortunately, not always so simple to follow!

#4 Stej

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Posted 30 July 2017 - 11:25 AM

Firstly, and importantly, form a clear intent to lose weight and tie this strongly into values that have meaning to you.  Seems obvious but knowing why you want to lose weight and why you should be committed to it is of fundamental importance.  Vague notions are too easy to disregard.

Secondly understand your appetite and eating behaviours.  

Thirdly realise that as you age maintaining muscle mass (even if it contributes to weight) is highly desirable.  A light weight squishy person with no muscle is probably less equipped for activities of daily living and other pursuits.

#5 riffraff

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Posted 30 July 2017 - 01:47 PM

Count calories.

Six months on MyFitnessPal and you'll get a good handle on the calories going down the cake hole.

And, sometimes, just a small adjustment (a few hundred calories daily) can make all the diffference.

Also, Stej's first para is a key fundamental.

#6 bingo01

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Posted 01 August 2017 - 12:51 PM

View PostBerlin, on 30 July 2017 - 07:44 AM, said:

- no alcohol
- no sweets (replace with fruits)
- nothing deep fried
- nothing crumbed +fried
- eat only when you are hungry. Hungry is that nasty feeling that makes you angry - it is not the absence of full.
- get used to being hungry
- when you start eating, start with some salads (of course no mayonnaise!) or veggies to fill the volume of your stomach with something low calorie
- eat lots of veggies and salads. (whole food, plant based as much as you can stomach).
- eat slowly - it takes about 15 minutes until satiation kicks in
- eat only until hungry disappears, not until full
- I can handle being hungry better at night, because I sleep!  so I tend to have my last meal very early in the evening (and light).
- there will be days when you fail. Move on and start again the next day.
- don't use running as an excuse to eat more.
- you will run very slowly, because you lack energy.

Caveat: I have never been on a weight loss journey of more than 8 kg and I was pretty good at putting most of it back on within a year.

Thanks Berlin!  There are some awesome tips, but putting it into action......hmmm
At my runninig club the other day we were talking about times and "how much you really want it" I want to lose 10kg - I would be 74kg and it would be quite acceptable considering my height, but how much do I really want it?  I really, really want to be below 80kg...I have more chance of getting to that than 74kg.

I have tried light and easy - it is way too expensive to maintain it, and what we need to do is to Learn how to eat well.  It is too easy if it is prepared for you.
My fitness pal - it is okay, but I then became obsessive about recording EVERYTHING (like I walked 10 minutes, I would add that).
I recently signed up for a "Freedom Food" program (which I didnt do), but it talked about Mindful eating and also what sort of eater are you - I was a rebel "I am not meat to eat that - Stuff it, yeas I can!"  That was insightful, and I think I could benefit more from that.
We all know what to do - it is just putting into practice!

#7 Davo

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Posted 01 August 2017 - 04:42 PM

About eighteen months ago I went on a "sort of" diet, wherein from Monday to Friday I ate nothing but fruit, vegetables, nuts  and berries; and drank nothing but herbal tea. No breads, no lollies, no cereals, no tea or coffee or milk, no meat or fish. Then on Saturday and Sunday I morphed into a normal human being and ate "normally."
I did lose weight; but for Christmas of 2015 I let myself go - as we all do at Christmas - and unfortunately haven't got back into it.
I intend to do it  again after my 75th birthday at the end of this month.
I recommend it. It gives you a short-term goal in that you can (hopefully) hold out until the weekend when you can eat more freely.

#8 dazmuzza

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Posted 01 August 2017 - 05:08 PM

The only ways I've successfully been able to lose weight is to quit alcohol entirely and eat healthily.

Recently I've been training really hard for half ironman and noted that I wasn't losing enough weight.

I invested in going to a sport dietician who reviewed my food diary and said I wasn't consuming enough good calories during the week and binging on crap on the weekend. Al;so had to crack down on alcohol and limit it entirely.

I've since changed my diet, taking in lots more calories but high quality and the weight is now coming off easily. You need fuel to train, make that fuel good stuff.

Paleo can work but I love food and I just don' tlove being that restrictive.

Go read MAtt Fitzgerald's book "Racing Weight" - has somne great ideas in there.

#9 AndyP

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Posted 01 August 2017 - 08:20 PM

I don't think I would get along with a dietician, as they would want me to eat green stuff.

#10 dazmuzza

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Posted 02 August 2017 - 11:09 AM

View PostAndyP, on 01 August 2017 - 08:20 PM, said:

I don't think I would get along with a dietician, as they would want me to eat green stuff.

Ha yeah, veges is a big thing.

But its actually pretty workable - my plan. Just a good variety of good stuff.

#11 darg75

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Posted 04 August 2017 - 09:14 PM

I am currently in weight loss mode.  My opinion on the first part of your question is based on what I've done over the past 8 months.

I'm not in maintenance mode however my experience YTD helps me form an opinion on that.

Jan 2017 ~95kgs.  Leading into the year (Oct-Dec 2016) I was averaging 2 runs a week with a monthly total of ~95kms.  Late in the year my 10 year old son made a comment about discipline which struck a chord with me.  In January I started running daily and upped my distance to about 45-50km / week.  I continued to eat and drink as I pleased.  I was drinking a lot of beer, most days 4-6 stubbies.  Even so I lost a kilo in January.  Then, next to nothing in Feb, a kg in March, next to nothing in April and a kg in May.  Slow, steady weight loss with about double my normal distance / week from last year.  Daily runs with a distance per month between 200 and 250kms.

In June I started my 20 week prep for Melbourne Marathon and in mid June I decided to give up grog for the remainder of the training time.

Since 19 June (first day off the drink) my weight has dropped from ~91.5kg to 88.5kg.  My training load has moved up a notch or two with my weekly distances moving more towards mid 60s.  

I lost as much weight in 6 1/2 weeks as I had for 5 months by removing grog.

I acknowledge that the increased training load (which comes about via chucking a couple of decent sized runs in each week along with the normal daily stuff) impacts on this but I believe it's the grog going out that helped most.

I also admit that my diet got a little worse since dropping the grog with other treats replacing it (chocolate).  Nonetheless a significant drop.

This week, for no reason other than I watched a doco and it sparked my curiosity, I decided to minimise dairy and drop meat.  I'm eating heaps more veg, same amount of fruit and I'm adding in lots more beans/legumes/stuff.  Just a "why not try it" expirement with no hard and fast rules around timeframes or results.  Five days in I feel good so we'll see how that expirement goes leading into Melbourne in October.  It may (I expect it will) contribute to further weight loss.

My key learning is that (for me) increased exercise had an impact however removing alcohol had a more pronounced impact.

So, this helps me build an opinion on maintaining:

1. I needed a reason to drop weight.  Ultimately it was an effect of something else that drove me, but the point stands.  So far this year I've had two (sons comment re discipline stung and Marathon goals).  I expect that I'll just as likely need a reason to motivate me to maintain.
2. I suspect that a return to my previous diet would likely see me chuck a kg or two on at worst but I'd likely maintain my weight based on a rubbish diet and a decent running volume.  If I didn't want to run as much I would need to be more careful about what goes in.

No particularly earth shattering stuff but I thought it was useful to share given its my actual, current experience happening right now.

So, in my opinion, in this order:

1. You need a reason to do the work that you actually genuinely care about.  Without this I can't see how you'd maintain the discipline.

2. Improving your diet (for me particularly around alcohol) has a substantial impact on weight loss.

3. Increasing your exercise output will impact this but not as heavily as a better diet will.

4. I expect that maintaining the exercise levels will be key to maintaining weight.

I hope you find number 1 Richard!!

#12 audrey27

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Posted 22 October 2017 - 07:27 AM

Hello,

I voted quit sugar, but I've noticed that some here comment their weight loss diet. Thanks for that.

Cheers

Edited by audrey27, 22 October 2017 - 07:28 AM.


#13 mytym

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Posted 22 October 2017 - 05:39 PM

Cut out the snacks and junk food.  Eat as much raw vegetables and fruit as you can.  Stop eating when you are no longer hungry, not when the plate is empty.  Drink only water and don't eat anything after dinner.  With or without exercise, this will keep the weight off.

#14 Hook

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Posted 26 October 2017 - 04:30 PM

This is a topic I've done a lot of research and trial and error on lol.
I think weight loss starts with awareness. I don't believe a "diet" is the best philosophy. Cutting out whole food groups can leave you with difficiences in essential vitamins and minerals if your not careful.
It takes lifestyle changes that are maintainable.
In the past I have tried a low carb ketogenic diet and the 5:2 intermittent fasting. Mostly though I just studied nutrition and did a lot of research on physiology. What I found is that for me there was no one key to weight loss. It required awareness of what and how much I was eating. I've lost 32kg and counting since March.

Interesting side note. You never actually lose the fat cells they just shrink. Which is why it is so hard to kept weight off once you've lost it. It is especially important not to be obese when growing due to this fact or it will always be very hard to keep the weight off in later life.

#15 JXT

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Posted 26 October 2017 - 05:51 PM

Hook - outstanding work losing 32kg since March. Iím from a family who are all morbidly obese - including one sister who was once an AIS athlete - so Iím always so impressed when someone has a year like youíve had.
Iíve always been fortunate/disciplined enough to not have dramatic weight gains. But my experience is that diet plays a significantly bigger role than exercise. For example, last year and early this year, I was averaging 140km per week and being pretty careful with my diet. Then in Feb I had a sacral stress fracture and running stopped for four months. With a very careful eye on my diet I dropped more than 5kg - from 67 to 62kg (Iím 177cm tall).
I only drink coffee (two per day) or water, so didnít have to give up alcohol, but it was reducing bread consumption that has made the biggest effect. I love baked goodies, so I have a daily struggle with my daily bread. Some days I nail six pieces of toast after a long run, but I try to limit it to one or two pieces per day.
Also, Iíve started eating considerably more fish as a source of protein.

#16 RunningSurfer

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Posted 26 October 2017 - 06:44 PM

Recently heard some research on set points with regards to body weight - that is propensity to regain weight after losing it is guided by the body wanting to get back to what it believes is the correct weight. Unfortunately when you put weight on this set point increases, but when you lose weight it stays high ( makes sense in an evolutionary sense).

The research group have found that small amounts of weight loss followed by a period of maintenance led to more long term weight loss.

In the ever scientific sample of one I somewhat agree as I lost a bit of weight and kept it off during the the year with running and now even with reduced excercise and plenty of dietary slip ups I have only added a kg or two (after losing 12)


#17 AndyP

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Posted 26 October 2017 - 08:20 PM

View PostHook, on 26 October 2017 - 04:30 PM, said:

Interesting side note. You never actually lose the fat cells they just shrink. Which is why it is so hard to kept weight off once you've lost it. It is especially important not to be obese when growing due to this fact or it will always be very hard to keep the weight off in later life.
I find that a bit depressing.  It makes me think that I will be stuck in an endless loop of gaining weight then having to lose it again.

#18 BogFrog

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Posted 26 October 2017 - 08:21 PM

32kg in 7 months?!? Holy sheet! That's fast. And a massive Congratulations!

I'm 5 foot (and half an inch) so pretty tiny height-wise.  I was always the tubby kid. Not "fat" but always a little overweight despite being a competative swimmer until 15 y/o - until my early 20s when I got to 70kgs (overweight) during a year of zero exercise and poor food choices. I lost 9kg in 6 weeks with a mixture of light gym work and a super super strict diet. Nearly zero carbs, but lots of fruit. 2 weeks strictly telling me what I could eat each meal, then 2 weeks of eat what I want, but only 4 slices of bread a week, no potatoes, rice or pasta. You get the drift. Very very little carbs. It worked and I learnt a lot aboit food. I put a little bit back on when I went off the diet, but 3 years later I decided I wanted to be slim for the first time in my life. So back to the diet that worked. I lost 10kg and got down to just over 50kg. I was slim for the first time and it lasted a year until I started "the creep".

Since then I have put on a bit. Some muscle and some fat. I'd love to get back to 53kg, but don't think it's possible as I'd have to deprive myself of so much food and drink that I love. So I shall continue being the everSoSlightlyTubby triathlete. I'm in the heathly range, but I'd be faster and (everSoSlightly) heathlier with 3kg less fat...

#19 RunningSurfer

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Posted 26 October 2017 - 09:36 PM

It's all extra flotation on the swim legs bogfrog - lose that 3kg and you might sink like a stone!

#20 dadagain

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Posted 27 October 2017 - 02:56 PM

View PostRunningSurfer, on 26 October 2017 - 09:36 PM, said:

It's all extra flotation on the swim legs bogfrog - lose that 3kg and you might sink like a stone!

That's my excuse for my appalling lack of ability in the pool.Just nowhere near enough bodyfat. I sink :(

#21 BogFrog

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Posted 27 October 2017 - 03:11 PM

View PostRunningSurfer, on 26 October 2017 - 09:36 PM, said:

It's all extra flotation on the swim legs bogfrog - lose that 3kg and you might sink like a stone!

Rubbish!  I'd be more streamlined.  Like a shark.  Or an arrow.  A speargun  ...or a whale

#22 RunningSurfer

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Posted 27 October 2017 - 05:27 PM

View PostBogFrog, on 27 October 2017 - 03:11 PM, said:

View PostRunningSurfer, on 26 October 2017 - 09:36 PM, said:

It's all extra flotation on the swim legs bogfrog - lose that 3kg and you might sink like a stone!

Rubbish!  I'd be more streamlined.  Like a shark.  Or an arrow.  A speargun  ...or a whale

Sharks have a significant girth when encountered for real....and arrows and speargun spears tend to sink....I stand by my flotation theory!

#23 elissawilliams

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Posted 01 December 2017 - 03:38 PM

Running is the best as it burns fat and decreases your body weight. Those who are overweight cannot perform exercises and for them, this exercise is recommended to sustain overall health and fitness in every way.

Five Amazing Health benefits of RUNNING for Your Health:

1. Help to build strong bones, as it is a weight bearing exercise
2. Enhance muscles
3. Increase cardiovascular fitness
4. Burn plenty of kilojoules
5. Help sustain a healthy weight.

Edited by elissawilliams, 01 December 2017 - 03:39 PM.


#24 OslerBoy

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Posted 04 December 2017 - 01:09 PM

my bullets:
  • even when i run 140+k a week my weight control isn't good because hunger goes up. Average weight of marathon runners these days proves exercise doesn't do much to control weight. Confusion in the media/society. Lack of proper studies. Food industry to blame. Key messages are lost...
  • insulin is driving hunger, so i dropped the sugar, carbs - wheat and any packaged food 5 years ago. Oh and even though a near alcoholic, i gave the booze away nearly a decade ago.
  • I'm never hungry now - on meat, dairy (cream, butter, cheese, full fat yogurt), nuts, veg, fish, olive and coconut oil. Fat satiates hunger.
  • I never have food prior to a long run - the idea is to teach the body to draw on body fat.
  • Read Tim Noakes, Lore of Nutrition and follow him on twitter - fan out from there...


#25 BeatYesterday

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Posted 09 January 2018 - 11:10 AM

I'm another one who thinks it's all about food.

I have just lost 4 kilos in 10 weeks and I have done it simply by counting calories and eating less and clean (easier said than done).
I still had the occasional 'cheat meal' because I hate feeling restricted and also it was the festive season so I didn't want to be the one munching on carrot sticks at end of year parties.

Now I'm back on maintenance mode and this is where it gets hard.
Losing weight is )fairly) easy, keeping it off is another story.

We'll see if my new weight is sustainable. I could maintain my previous weight with exercise only and could eat whatever I wanted.
I'm hoping my body adjust to this new set point.

#26 pogo69

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Posted 30 January 2018 - 12:22 PM

  • Learn to cook
  • And (with attribution to Michael Pollan):

    • Eat (real) food
    • Not too much
    • Mostly plants


#27 Keno

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Posted 31 January 2018 - 01:45 PM

I used my fitness pal, plus more walking. For me it's the key to help me manage my intake and make better choices.

Had great success over 12 months in 2013/14 losing 30kg (130 down to 100) which game me a "normal" BMI for the first time is 15-20 years.

I settled at 105 as my normal weight for some time without being too strict on my consumption of food/sugar/booze, but have recently started putting back on the weight after a few injuries.

The last 3 weeks I've got back on the app and regulate my consumption, and make better choices and am already down from 112 to 108. I want to be back at 100 by July for the GC Marathon.

I find that when I truly want something it will motivate me to achieve my goals -and that's way more valuable than a donut or beer

Edited by Keno, 31 January 2018 - 01:46 PM.


#28 Zedzded

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Posted 01 February 2018 - 11:16 AM

Raw chicken.

#29 SkyChariot

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Posted 01 February 2018 - 12:43 PM

^^^hope its dead first......and watch out for the salmonella.

#30 bobbys

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Posted 01 March 2018 - 04:35 AM

I find it very easy to put on weight- if I get injured, it jumps on pretty quickly. Last year, I was about to give up running but gave it one last shot and started to get fitter and managed 2 Marathons in 2 weeks. When I restarted, I didn't set out to loose weight - just be more careful. In the end, Since September I've lost over 8kg. For me, running doesn't help me loose weight but it does help speed up my metabolism and how it converts food to fat etc. Stopped eating fried stuff and had more natural food (or food my grandmother would recognise as a guide).

According to the height for weight, I'm still 7kg over but am now in the higher end of the healthy weight range for height. Also noticed my times improve a little. Would love to loose 4 more kgs.

#31 Maffrew

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Posted 04 March 2018 - 12:55 PM

I'm trying to lose 5-6kg to get back to what I consider my ideal running weight range currently, but finding it mighty frustrating. After taking up running (7 or 8 years ago now, time flies) I dropped 10-12kg in fairly steady manner overall, though there were a couple of periods where it dropped sharply. I got down to 65-66kg which is what I weighed when I ran my marathon PB in 2015. Since then I've had a couple of lengthy injury lay offs (3-4 months in both 2016 and 2017) and my weight gradually ticked up until at the beginning of this year I was 72kg and not particularly wanting to be that when I get back to GC marathon in July.

I'm running more as an average than ever before and tracking on myfitnesspal fairly consistently to keep an eye on what I'm eating but clearly still not quite getting it right; I'm mindful of not UNDER eating as I want to have the energy to get through my training, but perhaps sometimes I could still eat less. A couple of weeks ago I was 68.8 but an evening meal out celebrating a big achievement for my wife was all it took to blast it back up above 70kg. It comes off slow and goes back on sooooo quickly!

Generally trying to keep fat and protein fairly low but eat plenty of carbs since I'm burning lots of energy doing the training and I guess at this point I will experiment with tweaking the carbs down a bit lower as I think I probably need a bigger deficit than I thought.

#32 Streem26

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  • Location:Vancouver

Posted 23 August 2019 - 02:42 AM

Best way for me is
Meal plan ( I create templates like https://onplanners.c...e-meal-planners )Prepare your own meals and include vegetables, protein, whole grains and healthy fat. Don't overeat.
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Nutrition calculator that can help you gauge how many calories and what percentage of macronutrients will work the best for you desired goals.
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MOVE.

Edited by Streem26, 28 August 2019 - 06:44 PM.


#33 Sub17ParkRun

    CoolRunner

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  • Joined: 28-January 19
  • Sex:Male
  • Location:Perth

Posted 30 October 2019 - 02:10 PM

Gaining weight is far easier than losing it. The body will do whatever it takes to maintain the weight it feels most comfortable at.
Losing weight very quickly through starvation, dehydration, exercising more will slow the metabolism down.
Small changes like drinking more water or swapping carbs/sugar for more protein, gradual increase in exercise will help with gradual weight loss over time.