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Torn MeniscusSore knee

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#1 Anouk

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Posted 25 October 2017 - 07:49 PM

Hi,

Looking for help.   I have a torn meniscus in my right knee.  It was first scanned six years ago.  I then did 5+ years of very hard running on it without any problems.   In the last six months it has flared up to the point where I cannot do hard running without it getting too sore.   I have had it re-scanned and the tear has not got worse over the last six years.  I have tried resting it, physio and strengthening exercises but they have not solved it.   The doctor has suggested a next step to be injectables -  cortisone, PRP, Orthokine or Visco supplementation.   Does anyone have any experience with a torn meniscus or with the above treatments.   Any help greatly appreciated.

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#2 mytym

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Posted 26 October 2017 - 06:48 AM

I tore my meniscus in 2014 and it effectively ended my running career, or so I thought.  I never had any of the injectables you mention, but I did try everything else over the next four months after it happened and was never able to solve the problem.  Eventually I succumbed to the advice of the GP and had surgery to correct it, but despite the surgery going well and not causing any further damage, it made no difference to the problem.  No more running.

Fast forward to a year ago, I decided to alter my running style (reduce my stride length, eliminate high impact running, introduce grass running, reduce uneven surface striking (including road-to-footpath transitions) and now I'm getting back to somewhere close to where I was 42 months ago.

My advice: Eliminate high-impact hard running and DO NOT get surgery.

Like you (perhaps?), I loved hard running, and if I couldn't run hard, I had no motivation to run.  By reducing my stride length, I've managed to reduce the impact on my knee, yet still produce satisfactory results.  Now, if I wish to run hard, I increase my cadence.  It takes some getting used to, but I think I've extended my running life as a result.  I have a mantra that I try and stick to - "Don't land heavily, don't dig in, don't push off too hard - Do short quick strides, do lift up quickly, do focus and concentrate on this."

Good luck - There is hope!

#3 chonky

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Posted 26 October 2017 - 10:36 AM

I had a torn meniscus in 2015 i had tried lots of phyiso and strengthening work but after 6 months of no running i went and had the arthroscope. i limped out of surgery same day and started back running in 4 1/2 weeks later.The only sideeffect was a slightly weaker knee which lasted about a year. It feels strong these days. You have to remember an athroscope is preformed on a few footy players and high level tennis players and they come back and resume where they left off. I am lucky as my surgeon told me i have very good knees when he saw  my x rays. I was 51 years old he said they were the knees of a 20 year old.
regards chonky

#4 mytym

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Posted 26 October 2017 - 10:46 AM

They GP gave me the same spiel, but I wasn't so lucky.

#5 Clockwise

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Posted 26 October 2017 - 11:12 AM

My physio told me about a study where they compared sham arthroscopy with real arthroscopy in such cases, I believe it is this one: http://ard.bmj.com/c...211172.full.pdf

He explained that an arthroscopy - whether sham or real - leads patients to better compliance with prescribed exercises than without any arthroscopy.

#6 Stej

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Posted 26 October 2017 - 12:05 PM

View PostClockwise, on 26 October 2017 - 11:12 AM, said:

My physio told me about a study where they compared sham arthroscopy with real arthroscopy in such cases, I believe it is this one: http://ard.bmj.com/c...211172.full.pdf

He explained that an arthroscopy - whether sham or real - leads patients to better compliance with prescribed exercises than without any arthroscopy.

Interesting.  I can't help but wonder how convincing a sham arthroscopy would be.

#7 riffraff

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Posted 26 October 2017 - 07:05 PM

View Postmytym, on 26 October 2017 - 10:46 AM, said:

They GP gave me the same spiel, but I wasn't so lucky.

The bloke harvesting my hamstring during  ACL surgery said 99% of patients don't have any issues with hamstrings going forward.

Unlucky me.

Not much meniscus left in both knees (estimated at 30%) which made running too painful..........until I switched to trail and grass aths track.

#8 Clockwise

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Posted 27 October 2017 - 06:13 AM

View PostStej, on 26 October 2017 - 12:05 PM, said:

View PostClockwise, on 26 October 2017 - 11:12 AM, said:

My physio told me about a study where they compared sham arthroscopy with real arthroscopy in such cases, I believe it is this one: http://ard.bmj.com/c...211172.full.pdf

He explained that an arthroscopy - whether sham or real - leads patients to better compliance with prescribed exercises than without any arthroscopy.

Interesting.  I can't help but wonder how convincing a sham arthroscopy would be.

I am wondering more how to get through an ethics committee with such a study.

#9 Anouk

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Posted 01 November 2017 - 05:42 PM

Thanks everyone for your thoughts and advice.  Very helpful but not particularly encouraging.  Seems even surgery may not always work!

#10 Devley

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Posted 05 September 2019 - 05:42 AM

It depends on the type of tear and where it is.  You do have the ability to heal it your self.  Especially focusing on blood flow stimulation and keeping inflammation down.  If it is a complex tear in the white zone.  Most likely will need surgery.  Do your research, ask your Dr questions.  Some times they suture it, sometimes they cut part of it out.  Then you are starting a road leading to arthritis...probably.
I wish you the best and hope you are able to recover yourself.