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Sunscreen use when Running


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Poll: Sunscreen Use when Running (17 member(s) have cast votes)

Early Morning, Later in the Day (daylight but not peak sun)

  1. Never use sunscreen (but do run at this time) (9 votes [52.94%])

    Percentage of vote: 52.94%

  2. Seldom use sunscreen (1 votes [5.88%])

    Percentage of vote: 5.88%

  3. About half the time use sunscreen (1 votes [5.88%])

    Percentage of vote: 5.88%

  4. Regularly use sunscreen (2 votes [11.76%])

    Percentage of vote: 11.76%

  5. Always use sunscreen (3 votes [17.65%])

    Percentage of vote: 17.65%

  6. Never run at this time of day (1 votes [5.88%])

    Percentage of vote: 5.88%

Middle part of day

  1. Never use sunscreen (but do run at this time) (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  2. Seldom use sunscreen (2 votes [11.76%])

    Percentage of vote: 11.76%

  3. About half the time use sunscreen (2 votes [11.76%])

    Percentage of vote: 11.76%

  4. Regularly use sunscreen (4 votes [23.53%])

    Percentage of vote: 23.53%

  5. Always use sunscreen (5 votes [29.41%])

    Percentage of vote: 29.41%

  6. Never run at this time of day (4 votes [23.53%])

    Percentage of vote: 23.53%

At night (wouldn't want anyone feeling left out)

  1. Never use sunscreen (but do run at this time) (14 votes [82.35%])

    Percentage of vote: 82.35%

  2. Seldom use sunscreen (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  3. About half the time use sunscreen (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  4. Regularly use sunscreen (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  5. Always use sunscreen (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  6. Never run at this time (3 votes [17.65%])

    Percentage of vote: 17.65%

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#1 Stej

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Posted 25 January 2019 - 01:37 PM

I heard a report from a panel of experts earlier today saying that they would like the use of sunscreen to move from "Slip, Slop, Slap." to application as part of our everyday routine.  This was for all people with some incidental sun exposure not just people working outside.  This got me thinking about the additional long term exposure to extra UV from regular running.  

I was wondering who wears sunscreen when running (poll - if it works; need to put an answer for each question for it to work) or takes other measures when running to protect their skin.

Have you found a sunscreen that works better for running that others?

Edited by Stej, 25 January 2019 - 01:47 PM.


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#2 Jindalee

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Posted 25 January 2019 - 02:36 PM

Just voted.

Itís funny that you bring this up as I have read an article this week claiming we should use less sunscreen.
For me, if I just go to the train station to go to work or to the shops which is a 10 min walk I donít bother with sinscreen.
If I expect to be out longer than 30 mins for running, gardening whatever I always put sunscreen on.

Here the article I mentioned. Itís pretty long thought.

https://www.outsideo...-cancer-science

#3 Stej

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Posted 25 January 2019 - 03:02 PM

^ the incidental little bits of sun exposure is tricky.  The report I heard was on the ABC news where some experts had taken the view that little bits of exposure add up over time and they were recommending sunscreen use as part of the daily routine:
https://www.abc.net....tralia/10747734

#4 DrinksRunner

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Posted 25 January 2019 - 07:56 PM

I donít put sunscreen on at all for morning runs.
But lunchtime ones I put on arms, shoulders, and a little on face but not much so that it doesnít get in my eyes with sweat etc.
I just have a cheap spf50 one from local chemist which rubs in quickly.
Probably should wear a hat more to be honest.

#5 BogFrog

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Posted 26 January 2019 - 12:18 AM

Hate the stuff and will only wear it if I think I might get burnt. I also recently read that we should be wearing less - Vit D production being one main reason. Also read that sunscreen itself isn't good for us - just happens not to be as bad for us as gettung burnt

#6 undercover brother

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Posted 26 January 2019 - 06:20 AM

Personally I follow the advice of health experts like Pete Evans.
Hes a cook you know.
And doesnt he have such wonderful skin!

#7 Stej

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Posted 26 January 2019 - 10:10 AM

View Postundercover brother, on 26 January 2019 - 06:20 AM, said:

Personally I follow the advice of health experts like Pete Evans.
Hes a cook you know.
And doesnt he have such wonderful skin!

Yes.  Part of the problem is there is such a mixture of messages that people are unsure of what they should be doing.  While your post is amusing I thought you might have something more useful to say on this topic.

#8 HeadlampRunner

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Posted 26 January 2019 - 10:23 AM

I wear a cap and if I am going out for a run during peak sun times I apply sunscreen to all areas not covered by clothes except the area above my eyes (I figure the cap takes care of that).  That way I don't get stingy red eyes due to sunscreen.  The cap also works as a bit of a dam to stop the flow of sweat into my eyes too.

Someone once told me to use baby sunscreen for my forehead... Supposedly it is designed to not sting your eyes.  I never ended up trying it.

#9 Stej

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Posted 26 January 2019 - 10:51 AM

This is interesting - government published UV index searchable by date, location, with graph of UV over the day.  Makes sense with the old recommendation of minimal protection being ok when UV index below 3.  

https://www.arpansa....radiation-index

#10 Davo

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Posted 26 January 2019 - 12:47 PM

Reminds me of the old Goon Show joke:-
"We're going to send up a rocket around the sun."
"What about the heat?"
"Oh, that won't be a problem."
"Why not."
"We're going to go at night time."

Boom boom!

#11 Davinator

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Posted 26 January 2019 - 03:27 PM

Surprisingly little time in sun needed for Vitamin D production, I think it's about 10min in Summer and 15min or so in Winter.
Perhaps better to get that while wearing regular clothes than our skimpier running outfits.
Timely point Stej, I had been thinking about covering up more.
I always wear a cap apart from evening. I have been thinking of wearing broad-brimmed surf style hats with a strap and have some legionaires style caps to try.
I am not sure whether bucket hats have a bit enough brim, I would prefer more nose coverage.
I wear sunscreen if running say between 9 and 4.
I usually run in a singlet but am starting to use T shirts.

I don't wear a hat when racing. That's winter and mainly 5-10k, City to Surf, maybe a half-marathon. Probably to save fiddly adjustments and over-heating.
Yet not a bother on hard training runs. I bring a cap for after the race.

So I guess I am looking at covering up to allow for missing areas when put on sunscreen.
Think about a roll on or lip balm style if you don't like the feel of sunscreen on your hands.
Do your research, I read the spray isn't very effective.

I think one of the points BF might be referring to is nano-particles and physical barriers such as titanium dioxide.
My skin and family history means I would stay with sunscreen until a proven alternative (while still choosing time of day and covering up).

What about sunglasses? (Slip slop slap slide on a shirt wrap on some sunnies.) I rarely run in them, my running partner never wears a cap but always in sunnies.

#12 Stej

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Posted 26 January 2019 - 04:01 PM

View PostDavinator, on 26 January 2019 - 03:27 PM, said:

I usually run in a singlet but am starting to use T shirts.

Yeah, I also quickly read through some research on melanoma experience in marathon runners.  The prime location for this melanoma was the top of the shoulders or back.  Another interesting question raised was whether a lot of endurance running depressed the immune system or in some way increased the risk of skin cancer (all other things being equal e.g. amount of exposure but one person an endurance runner and another otherwise identical person not).

Edit: found it.  Attached.  Not a really big study or any real surprises.  Not done in Australian conditions either.  Still caught my attention.

Attached File  Malignant Melanoma in Marathon Runners.pdf   79.49K   4 downloads

Edited by Stej, 26 January 2019 - 04:08 PM.


#13 undercover brother

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Posted 26 January 2019 - 07:34 PM

View PostStej, on 26 January 2019 - 10:10 AM, said:

While your post is amusing I thought you might have something more useful to say on this topic.

because?

#14 BogFrog

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Posted 26 January 2019 - 07:57 PM

View PostDavinator, on 26 January 2019 - 03:27 PM, said:

Surprisingly little time in sun needed for Vitamin D production, I think it's about 10min in Summer and 15min or so in Winter.
Perhaps better to get that while wearing regular clothes than our skimpier running outfits.

Isn't the point that the skin be exposed for that 15 mind? So skimpier the better?

#15 Davinator

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Posted 26 January 2019 - 09:32 PM

Skin, not necessarily luminescent skin.
ie Avoid a burn.
Also, most people run for longer than 15min and probably don't break out sunscreen at that point.

I'm suggesting you prob don't want usually unexposed skin out there for full 15min without sun protection.
People can get their Vitamin D eating lunch outside or walking (where they could do that).

#16 Bellthorpe

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Posted 27 January 2019 - 03:49 AM

I've now had three BCCs cut out. Two in Singapore and one here in France. The last one was yuge, the scar is well over an inch long. But that wasn't visible pre-surgery. As you all know, left unhindered they can be fatal.

Do I use sunscreen? Bloody hell I do!

#17 Stej

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Posted 27 January 2019 - 01:37 PM

View Postundercover brother, on 26 January 2019 - 07:34 PM, said:

View PostStej, on 26 January 2019 - 10:10 AM, said:

While your post is amusing I thought you might have something more useful to say on this topic.

because?

Because you have some medical training and insight into health matters.  Because you live in Brisbane (fairly high sunshine and UV spot).  And because I know you have a whole lot to give............................. *



* including but not limited to a certain pizza oven

The following link is to the press release from a group of Aust researchers and public health bodies that returned this issue to the news recently:
https://www.scimex.o...3ML4ABEDjam2BhY

#18 Bellthorpe

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Posted 27 January 2019 - 10:23 PM

Here's the published article itself.

https://onlinelibrar...1753-6405.12873

#19 Stej

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Posted 28 January 2019 - 02:30 PM

View PostBellthorpe, on 27 January 2019 - 10:23 PM, said:

Here's the published article itself.

https://onlinelibrar...1753-6405.12873

Very good article - comprehensive and from what would appear to be an authoritative, informed and independent source.  Nice.


I think I have reached the conclusion that the design specs on humans really need to be revisited.   Skin more resistant to UV would be nice.  And if I am being greedy perhaps night vision, the power of flight, and a few other things.  Meanwhile maybe the more modest aim of better sunscreens.

#20 NavyDiverJB

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Posted 31 January 2019 - 05:16 PM

Sadly a white boy. Spent 3 years having no winter. Northern Hemisphere Southern  Hemisphere and Navy ships allowed me that. I had a slight tinge after that which left a week afterwards! Noticed a lot of fishing people now using long sleeved shirts and some almost full faced hats to reduce  to sun exposure. While I should have long sleeve might and do use a hat covers for my follicly challenged head. It is not as big as a hat I use if I was in a boat.

I pack the sun screen on. Many of my Navy mates are paying a huge price for the many shirtless years on the oceans over the world. Not worth the risk.

I doubt Vit D is an issue for almost any runner.

Edited by NavyDiverJB, 31 January 2019 - 05:18 PM.


#21 Stej

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Posted 01 February 2019 - 11:14 AM

View PostNavyDiverJB, on 31 January 2019 - 05:16 PM, said:

Many of my Navy mates are paying a huge price for the many shirtless years on the oceans over the world. Not worth the risk.

I have wondered about this - current workplace OHS imposes the requirement on the employer to provide a safe workplace.  I have wondered whether it is sufficient then to simply make available sun related PPE  for outdoor workers or those with significant sun exposure (ie hats, sunscreen, work gear that covers skin well) or whether the employers are required to enforce the using of suitable protection.  That is, for example, if you offer your apprentice builder (for arguments sake) all the right gear but they refuse to wear it and want to go around shirtless and in shorts do you as employer have a liability for not enforcing use of more protective gear.  It's about the balance between employer responsibility and duty of the individual to take care of themself.  Hmmmm.

#22 Davo

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Posted 01 February 2019 - 01:16 PM

View PostStej, on 01 February 2019 - 11:14 AM, said:

View PostNavyDiverJB, on 31 January 2019 - 05:16 PM, said:

Many of my Navy mates are paying a huge price for the many shirtless years on the oceans over the world. Not worth the risk.

I have wondered about this - current workplace OHS imposes the requirement on the employer to provide a safe workplace.  I have wondered whether it is sufficient then to simply make available sun related PPE  for outdoor workers or those with significant sun exposure (ie hats, sunscreen, work gear that covers skin well) or whether the employers are required to enforce the using of suitable protection.  That is, for example, if you offer your apprentice builder (for arguments sake) all the right gear but they refuse to wear it and want to go around shirtless and in shorts do you as employer have a liability for not enforcing use of more protective gear.  It's about the balance between employer responsibility and duty of the individual to take care of themself.  Hmmmm.
On a slightly different note, Stej, but with the same principle.....when I worked in a horticultural college in TAFE, the students were instructed always to come in stout footwear. If they didn't, they were sent home. No arguments, no excuses. If I was the boss of a building site i'd be applying the same attitude towards, not only towards footwear, but sun protection too.

#23 Davinator

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Posted 01 February 2019 - 03:54 PM

Appears national model laws were introduced in 2011 State by State.
Bosses have to ensure worker safety as reasonably practicable.
Workers have to take responsibility for own safety and follow instructions and policy.
Reasonable? Yes.
But can people be bothered to follow and enforce?
In an industry where people are supposed to model behaviour, the number who would be outside without any sort of hat and with open toe shoes was remarkable.
Me, I would have rewarded the ones doing the right thing (duties), and if that didn't work provide sombrero, clown shoes, and Freddie Krueger mask.
OK, perhaps last is harsh, instead apply zinc cream with a paint brush/roller.

Perhaps insurers doing a blitz so they can increase premiums?

#24 BogFrog

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Posted 01 February 2019 - 09:20 PM

View PostNavyDiverJB, on 31 January 2019 - 05:16 PM, said:

I doubt Vit D is an issue for almost any runner.

Bzzzzz I was found to be very deficient a few years ago - the doc ordered the test and I laughed at her - I swim outdoors, run & cycle and had a tan. I had half the minimum recommended levels...

#25 NavyDiverJB

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Posted 01 February 2019 - 09:43 PM

View PostBogFrog, on 01 February 2019 - 09:20 PM, said:

View PostNavyDiverJB, on 31 January 2019 - 05:16 PM, said:

I doubt Vit D is an issue for almost any runner.

Bzzzzz I was found to be very deficient a few years ago - the doc ordered the test and I laughed at her - I swim outdoors, run & cycle and had a tan. I had half the minimum recommended levels...
Thats Crook. Careful with using the supplements. a lot of snake oil I hear

I also think employer might have responsibility to  be careful. We have a much bigger interest in longevity I feel. The builders next door laying a concrete slab early this week clearly think shirtless, shorts and no hat is cool. I did see a bottle of sun screen in one of the trucks. Pretty sure they did not use it. https://www.melanoma...and-statistics/

14000 new cases 2017! Not impossible to avoid being a statistic. The concrete crew or navy crew from my youth clearly are not in the clear. I hate sunscreen but I know I am going to sweat and need a hose post running regardless so put it on via the 750ml bottles. My kids are better than I am with it thankfully.

Edited by NavyDiverJB, 01 February 2019 - 09:51 PM.


#26 BogFrog

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Posted 01 February 2019 - 10:26 PM

There's a difference between taking supliments if you are deficient in something or just taking them because they might be good for you...  I took bit D for 6 months to get to a normal level, then stopped