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Need help planning for my 2nd half marathon


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#1 Rezniv

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Posted 31 May 2019 - 04:31 PM

I am a beginner at long distance running and endurance sports/activities. Entered the Melbourne half marathon (2015) with very minimal training and achieved the bottom 50 place (Age:20-39) in just under 3 hours.

I finished reading the book "Can't hurt me" by David Goggins and it motivated me so much I feel my mindset towards running has completely changed (And I hope it will last). I used to go into counting down the distance when I start running and just want it to be over, but these days I wish the runs can be longer and I feel guilty when I still have something left in the tank after the runs. I've been waking up 2 hours before my usual time and using it for my training. I signed up for the half marathon again and there is 5 months or so to go and I figured I better come up with a training plan to tackle it.

Here's what I plan to do so far:

* A week's training will include a long/easy run, a tempo run, an interval run, a cross training session and 2 rest days
* Aiming to do around 25-30km total distance a week
* The cross training day will be cycling
* I am not too concerned about HR zone training at this point because my pace is around 7 min/km for a 4k run and my HR gets into zone 3/4 after just a couple of minutes running. I may focus more on it once my HR is more stable.

I try not to overthink it as my fitness level is really low at the moment and getting the base up is my focus for the first couple of months.

What do you think about my plan? Much appreciated for any input on any other aspects of running as well.

Thanks a lot!

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#2 Stej

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Posted 01 June 2019 - 10:58 AM

I think you should be doing at least two easy/comfortable paced runs a week.  Possibly even three.  Then a long run to make up to 4 runs per week.  If you are coming off a reasonably low fitness base then you need to increase gradually or risk injury.  Once you have done this and done your 2nd HM you can add in tempo and interval work for future half marathons.  I think establishing the habit of running and consistency (rather than boom and bust training) gives the best results.  Enjoy the process.

#3 riffraff

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Posted 01 June 2019 - 11:00 AM

What stej says.

Altho’ I d still include a tempo of sorts but definitely drop the intervals for now.

#4 Rezniv

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Posted 03 June 2019 - 04:37 PM

Thanks guys. I will do more easy runs to start.

Enjoying it very much so far. I guess I always try to do hard runs because otherwise it doesn't feel like a workout, but sounds like doing hard runs at the start is counter-productive. Let me focus on the easy runs for a couple of months and see what happens.

Thanks again

#5 claudicles

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Posted 04 June 2019 - 06:57 AM

Hi Rezniv. I am no expert but I have run 9 HMs and improved my time each time until the last. I struggled with my first and ended up realising I would have been more comfortable running that distance if I had regularly done more distance in training. I found a training plan and followed it which helped me to feel like I wasn't just making it up and knew someone who knew what they were talking about had planned something that worked. I used one of Hal Higden's plan and did the next seven HMs following them. I've switched to Jack Daniel's (not the drink!) but mainly because I am getting guidance from someone at my gym and he worked it out for me. There are plenty of others around. Mainly I think it helps to plan your long runs to gradually increase and make sure you are getting enough distance between times. Doing weight training a couple of times a week also helps me avoid injury and wards off the tired legs distance can create but not everyone seems to need that.
Oh and I think you should have some energy left at the end of a training run. Save going all out for the actual HM. You'll take too long to recover between runs to get the most out of your training otherwise.
Good luck and enjoy!
Liz

#6 darg75

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Posted 07 June 2019 - 05:57 PM

Good luck with it Rezniv.  Sticking at it is the biggest difference maker.  

Before you know it 7 minutes kms are 6:30s, 6:30s become 6:00 and you’re getting fitter!

It’s a cool feeling and does wonders for your mental and emotional wellbeing.

Looking forward to hearing updates on the training.



#7 SkyChariot

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Posted 11 June 2019 - 01:09 PM

Howdy Rezniv, and welcome to the forums. I hope you will keep us undated on your progress and hang around, [we are not a bad bunch!] I like that you are being realistic. You know your fitness levels are low, and are not expecting miracles. Good advice above. To add my five cents worth, enjoyment is the key here, and i am glad to see that you mention you are enjoying running again and have a different outlook than you did before. If you are relaxed and happy, you will run better. No need to get too fancy too soon. Just take some time to build your fitness first before you start worrying about all the other stuff. No need to put the cart before the horse. Best that you get some slow steady ks in your legs, and make sure you have good running form, as that will make it feel easier and you have less chance of getting injured. I see too many people take up running with low fitness, and they want it all to happen overnight, then they get either injured or dissillusioned. They want to go fast without putting into the thought about how they are actually running and waste a lot of energy and get injured. It takes a while to get your whole body into running mode when you have not run much for a long time. Just enjoy your lead up, and enjoy being part of the race. You will learn a lot from it all that you can build on for the next one.