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Deflating first marathon


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#1 davidsalata

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Posted 21 June 2019 - 12:14 AM

I took up running again in Feb 2018, I ran a HM that March in 2 hours. Over the following year I trained for the Manchester Marathon, during this time my HM record dropped to 1hr43 then 1hr40.

I trained predominantly to my HR, firstly using Fitzgerald 80/20 principles then later followed Pfitzinger up to 55 mile Advanced Marathoning plan along with 1hr30 yoga each week. I totalled 1700 miles between taking up running again and the marathon.

Online calculators, Marco method and McMillan both estimated that I could run the marathon in just over 3hr30. As this was my first marathon I aimed conservative and plugged in 3hr45 on the Race Pace function of my watch.

One of the positives for me was my pacing strategy, to get my target time I needed to average 8:35 mi/miles. The first 10 k averaged 8:43 by the half way mark this dropped to 8:41 and at mile 19 I was at 8:39 mi/miles.

I can’t recall exactly when it happened but it must have been around this point that my quads simply quit on me. I could still run, but my pace dropped to around 09:00 mi/miles.

My energy levels were good and aerobically I was sound, my average hr was 171 at mile 6 but dropped and settled to 165 bpm for the remainder of the race (for ref my max is 187, LHR 178).

I finished in a deflating 3hr49, with my quads being the only restricting factor tbh.

Advice/views on this? Is it simply a case of time on my feet and continue running to build the quad endurance or are there other exercises I should consider before my next marathon?

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#2 dadagain

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Posted 21 June 2019 - 07:58 AM

You targeted 3:45 and ran 3:49  for your first marathon and you're deflated???

Sounds like an awesome result to me!

If you've only been running for a short time - then stepping up to the marathon is always going to be hard. The various race target calculators always assume you're well trained for that particular distance. It may well be that you've adapted well to half marathon distance, but need more mileage in your legs to really get used to long runs. How many 30km+ runs have you done?.

When my half marathon time came down to sensible times, it still took me a few marathons to get it right. It wasnt until I had a year with about 20 30km+ runs in (including 4 marathons) that I felt like I'd got on top of how to run 42km.

(Also btw: this is an Australian site - talking in min/mile will be fairly meaningless to most of us!)

#3 undercover brother

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Posted 21 June 2019 - 10:13 AM

Most people trying their first marathon end up lying in the gutter cramping and spewing or at least miss their goal by a long way.
You did bloody well bro!

#4 HeadlampRunner

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Posted 21 June 2019 - 07:48 PM

I agree with DadAgain and undercover brother.  That's an awesome first effort.

I struggled in the last 10 or 12k of my first marathon ans lost close to a minute a k.
I think the reason I suffered then was that I hadn't done enough long runs (30k or more).

It takes a while to build endurance, so be patient.  You'll do better next time.

#5 DrinksRunner

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Posted 24 June 2019 - 02:47 PM

Good first effort.

Most people get tired in quads late in the marathon.
Fast Downhill running in training may help strengthen quads, but also injury risk.

Generally though it is a sign of fatigue and your body wasn’t properly conditioned for the pace.

Very good effort and pacing, with more training you could be expected to get closer to the 3:30 marathon predictions.

Can always argue course / hills / wind/  heat made it difficult on the day and attributed to you finishing a couple minutes off your prediction.

#6 NavyDiverJB

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Posted 28 June 2019 - 03:38 PM

View Postdavidsalata, on 21 June 2019 - 12:14 AM, said:

I took up running again in Feb 2018, I ran a HM that March in 2 hours. Over the following year I trained for the Manchester Marathon, during this time my HM record dropped to 1hr43 then 1hr40.

I trained predominantly to my HR, firstly using Fitzgerald 80/20 principles then later followed Pfitzinger up to 55 mile Advanced Marathoning plan along with 1hr30 yoga each week. I totalled 1700 miles between taking up running again and the marathon.

Online calculators, Marco method and McMillan both estimated that I could run the marathon in just over 3hr30. As this was my first marathon I aimed conservative and plugged in 3hr45 on the Race Pace function of my watch.

One of the positives for me was my pacing strategy, to get my target time I needed to average 8:35 mi/miles. The first 10 k averaged 8:43 by the half way mark this dropped to 8:41 and at mile 19 I was at 8:39 mi/miles.

I can’t recall exactly when it happened but it must have been around this point that my quads simply quit on me. I could still run, but my pace dropped to around 09:00 mi/miles.

My energy levels were good and aerobically I was sound, my average hr was 171 at mile 6 but dropped and settled to 165 bpm for the remainder of the race (for ref my max is 187, LHR 178).

I finished in a deflating 3hr49, with my quads being the only restricting factor tbh.

Advice/views on this? Is it simply a case of time on my feet and continue running to build the quad endurance or are there other exercises I should consider before my next marathon?

Sent from my LG-H930 using Tapatalk

A new PB well done for a dozen reasons. Now you know what happens your next PB awaits. All the planing, training programs, time estimates are irrelevant race day. Just keep enjoying it. I think we all over plan and research at first. It gets easier and easier until you reach your potential which should be a lot better than your first run. If you really want to get sub 3 or insanely and cooly fast a coach might be needed. There are some amazing types that can do a negative split. Like you I an a struggle to the end type. I love trying to make myself keep moving when it hits. I am replicating that a little by going faster after a long run or adding fartlek after a long run. My new not scientific rule is race pace as my base speed and everything else above it. Using race pace as recovery is surprisingly refreshing after going a lot faster for a while. Have fun and enjoy is the most important unless your trying for sub 2hours :)

#7 Stej

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Posted 29 June 2019 - 11:32 AM

I don't think there is too much of a reason to be deflated.  You've completed your first marathon.  There are always more opportunities for further marathons to improve your time.  The glass is half full.