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Shoes with carbon fibre plate


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#1 riffraff

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Posted 27 June 2019 - 05:58 PM

Seems like the latest fad being adopted by the big brands including: Nike, Hoka, New Balance.

Anyone here with enough cash to have tried any of these shoes?

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#2 Stej

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Posted 28 June 2019 - 11:06 AM

I'd also like to know how long the carbon component lasts - does it retain its stiffness and springiness for a reasonable period?  I suspect there is also a point where changes to the shoes can go beyond the intention of providing protection and traction and become something more akin to using springs or inserting a jet propulsion device.

Edited by Stej, 28 June 2019 - 11:07 AM.


#3 Bizi

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Posted 29 June 2019 - 03:08 PM

Hi Riffraff and Stej
I am the happiest runner I know, who has CF aided shoes. In need of some shoes for fast training runs, I bought the Nike Zoom Fly Flyknit shoes when they were (are) on clearance at the Nike AU website.

This was after a disappointing trial of some Adidas boost shoes which I found were too soft.

My fastest shoes prior to these are New Balance Vazee and Asics Noosa Tri.

Bottom line is that the Nike Fly have helped propel me to so e PRs in training runs around Mrs Macquarie's Chair, around the Sydney Opera House and the run there and back from my office.

The differences, coming from fast stability shoes, is first, the higher stack height, the higher-feeling drop and the lack of stability due to a very narrow but thick sole.

The stack height, along with the carbon blade, propels me onto my forefoot, to increase my cadence.

It's  maybe a combo of more rinni g helping me get lighter, plus more intervals, that's helped me push harder with these shoes, have more energy and a feel of less wear and tear on my legs due to the higher cushioning.

Only downsides are puddles since the Flyknit can get heavy when wet.

#4 Bizi

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Posted 29 June 2019 - 03:15 PM

Stej, if you're not worried about the puddles please try these shoes and tell me if it's just me!

When I saw the clearance deal was on for these shoes, I read a lot of reviews, checked for sizing at the Sydney CBD Nike shop, then ordered. They arrived within days.

I try to cycle between these and the NBs. Whatever I do, my runs pace is a tiny bit faster with these shoes.

It will depend on your preferences, but for faster training runs, sub 5min/km,use these. On my best segments I'm in the 3.40s and the worst around 5min/km.

The shoes are amazing on sprints, too. So it's not just the CF plate. It's everything.

Saying this, I'd like to try the Hoka with the plate, since this shoe is a Nike 4% crossed with a Hoka One One!


#5 Stej

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Posted 29 June 2019 - 04:24 PM

View PostBizi, on 29 June 2019 - 03:15 PM, said:

I try to cycle between these and the NBs. Whatever I do, my runs pace is a tiny bit faster with these shoes.

Speaking of cycling, I do have some 100% carbon fibre sole road cycling shoes.  If a little bit of carbon is good then 100%  carbon must be........  Maybe I'll just have to try running in these cycling shoes with the road bike cleats.  Ha!  Wheeeee-splat.

Seriously though a quick browse of the internet on carbon fibre in running shoes suggests there may be some benefits in terms of adding some useful stiffness and improving the amount of forward movement for a given amount of energy input.  I'm not sure if it has been crossed yet but there is a line between having shoes for foot protection and traction and shoes as a performance aid in themself e.g. having - if possible - giant springs on your feet.

Maybe I'll try this next shoe purchase.

Edited by Stej, 29 June 2019 - 04:25 PM.


#6 moby

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Posted 09 July 2019 - 11:07 AM

I have a pair of the 4% which I’m happy to sell if anyone is interested. They are blue, size 12 (I usually wear 11.5 and these run a bit small so went up ½ size) only worn twice for a total of 44km.

For some reason they just don’t work for me. The second (and last) time I wore them was for 34km and by about 20 they were really starting to hurt my feet. It was literally like running on a steel floor in my bare feet. Could be the placing of the carbon fibre plate doesn’t suit me – I normally run in a pretty flat shoe (Saucony Kinvara or racing flat) but do have a pair of the original Nike Zoom Fly which have some kind of nylon plate in them and they have been perfectly fine.

I’ve only seen one or two other reports of people having similar foot pain running in the 4% and given the large and increasing number of people wearing them I must be in the minority.

#7 redbackrun

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Posted 09 July 2019 - 12:41 PM

Picked up a pair of Nike Zoom Fly Flyknit 2 from DFO for $112.00. At that price why not give them a go. Never felt i was in the shoe but on top of it. The knit upper is too loose around the heel. This gave me Achilles issues on my first speed work from turning tight corners and right knee issues from fighting the lack of stability. The knit would rub against my Achilles so had to tape that area for a few runs until it softened. Some top of foot pain as well. They do feel a cushioned shoe and i still wear them on some runs, even on the treadmill. They are on the heavy side size 11.5 - 282g and feel heavy running.

#8 mik

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 09:16 PM

Well, while it's not exactly the same thing, my NB 2040's have a carbon plate in them, from 2012...my Brooks The Truth from 1995 have 2 carbon plates in them (both of these are still going), my Reebok Furies had a carbon plate in 1994 and my Etonic V02's had one as well in 1993...so not exactly a new thing.