Jump to content


Salazar - doping banSalazar cops 4 years - Nike team in dissaray


  • You cannot reply to this topic
29 replies to this topic

#1 speedmeup

    veryCoolRunner

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 898 posts
  • Joined: 02-January 12
  • Sex:Male
  • Location:Ballina

Posted 02 October 2019 - 12:02 PM

After a few years speculation Salazar cops a 4 year ban from involvement in athletics.

Throws a big shadow on some high profile athletes . . Mo Farah, Galen Rupp

Support our Australian advertisers:

#2 riffraff

    1000-club gold-rated CoolRunner

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,623 posts
  • Joined: 27-April 09
  • Sex:Male
  • Location:Sydney

Posted 03 October 2019 - 11:37 AM

Farah the big one.

Read yesterday Steve Cram defending Mo on the basis that he's.............an Englishman.

Fact remains, Farah was at the low end of elite pecking order until he found Salazar and NOP.

#3 JXT

    1000-club gold-rated CoolRunner

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,547 posts
  • Joined: 13-May 10
  • Sex:Male
  • Location:Lilyfield

Posted 03 October 2019 - 12:12 PM

I know that she wasn’t with NOP but Radcliffe’s take is a strange one - that it was a get square for USADA after letting Coleman off the hook.
Implication for Nike isn’t great in that the CEO knew about some of the testing and wanted to be kept updated.

#4 bobbys

    1000-club gold-rated CoolRunner

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,453 posts
  • Joined: 19-January 09
  • Sex:Male
  • Location:Sydney - Inner West

Posted 03 October 2019 - 12:47 PM

A few interesting reactions from athletes coached by Peter Julian - quickly distancing Peter (and themselves) from Salazar. Here is a timeline of what's been happening (taken from Runnersworld.com)

https://www.runnersw...project-doping/

I think anyone being trained under Salazar during the window of time as part of the investigation would have questions to answer about their performance.

#5 riffraff

    1000-club gold-rated CoolRunner

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,623 posts
  • Joined: 27-April 09
  • Sex:Male
  • Location:Sydney

Posted 03 October 2019 - 04:17 PM

View Postbobbys, on 03 October 2019 - 12:47 PM, said:

A few interesting reactions from athletes coached by Peter Julian - quickly distancing Peter (and themselves) from Salazar. Here is a timeline of what's been happening (taken from Runnersworld.com)

https://www.runnersw...project-doping/

I think anyone being trained under Salazar during the window of time as part of the investigation would have questions to answer about their performance.

Every, single, one of them.

Might grab some popcorn and watch it all unravel.

#6 DrinksRunner

    veryCoolRunner

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 910 posts
  • Joined: 16-January 14
  • Sex:Male
  • Location:Launceston

Posted 04 October 2019 - 09:14 AM

similar to cycling and Sky - TUE's for Asthama and taking prednisone  (asthama drug)  which helps build/increase lung capacity I believe

Edited by DrinksRunner, 04 October 2019 - 09:15 AM.


#7 speedmeup

    veryCoolRunner

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 898 posts
  • Joined: 02-January 12
  • Sex:Male
  • Location:Ballina

Posted 04 October 2019 - 10:57 AM

Clearly Nike and Salazar were pushing the boundaries and fiddling around the edges of what they thought they could get away with - i.e. "let's use chemicals at the highest limit that is legal and/or at a level we don't think it will be detected"

But ultimately it all came crashing down.

Nike I'm sure want the $ sales - so turned a blind eye as long as their product was associated with winning athletes … now it's bitten them in the ass big time.

Edited by speedmeup, 04 October 2019 - 11:12 AM.


#8 JXT

    1000-club gold-rated CoolRunner

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,547 posts
  • Joined: 13-May 10
  • Sex:Male
  • Location:Lilyfield

Posted 04 October 2019 - 12:44 PM

While it's certainly a bad look for Nike and I doubt that the CEO is a popular figure within the company, Nike as a business will brush this off. Nike's total spend on USATF, NOP and Bowerman combined is significantly less than their spend on college basketball or college football (much less their spend on pro basketball, US football or even clubs such as Paris St-Germain). And while I don't have the numbers, I'd be willing to bet that the revenue raised from the running side of the business is a drop in the bucket compared to that raised by basketball or football.
To people such as us who follow the sport, this is probably the biggest doping bust since Armstrong, but it's not making the general news like Armstrong did. Sadly, T&F and road racing is just not on the radar of the general public, save for 10 seconds every four years when the 100m final is on.
Case in point, the AFL grand final never fails to trot out this 'fact' - either on the commentary or some muppet who has heard it previously and regurgitates it: during the course of an AFL game, many players ran two marathons. That line was actually said to me last Saturday evening. I expressed my astonishment that not only can these AFL players twice break the world marathon record, they do so while playing a game of football. Whoosh, straight over the person's head.

It's really interesting to see athletes turning on each other. The latest spat is between Jenny Simpson and Craig Engels. And there's another brewing between Rowbury and Simpson.

#9 SkyChariot

    1000-club gold-rated CoolRunner

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,842 posts
  • Joined: 10-November 11
  • Sex:Female
  • Location:corrimal

Posted 04 October 2019 - 04:09 PM

^^^JXT, some people actually dont know what a marathon is. They think the city to surf is a marathon, or i have even heard people say they ran a 10k marathon. AFL players run around 15ks to 16ks in the course of a match, and we know thats not a marathon, but some people have no idea. On this drug thing. Shame on them. Anyone who deliberately takes something to enhance their performance is a disgrace, and they deserve to be wiped right out of sport. At the end of the day, if you do all the training, and perform to the best of your ability, thats what matters, not cheating and winning medals, as, you will always be remembered for that, and you not only tarnish yourself, but it reflects on your country. Any coach that expects their players to take stuff to make not only their charges perform better, but make them look good as coaches, is even worse.

#10 speedmeup

    veryCoolRunner

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 898 posts
  • Joined: 02-January 12
  • Sex:Male
  • Location:Ballina

Posted 04 October 2019 - 04:41 PM

my brother in law, a keen ausse rule player once asked me what my best two k time was. I told him and he was surprised - said - "your time is faster than the best draft player in the AFL this year. "

I tried to explain to him that footy players and runners are different in build, and most of those big bodied young lads just aren't that great at distance running. I think he thought that anyone who could run a singe sub 3 k ought to be drafted.

#11 Stej

    1000-club gold-rated CoolRunner

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,063 posts
  • Joined: 06-January 08
  • Sex:Male
  • Location:Melbourne

Posted 04 October 2019 - 06:41 PM

View Postspeedmeup, on 04 October 2019 - 10:57 AM, said:

Clearly Nike and Salazar were pushing the boundaries and fiddling around the edges of what they thought they could get away with - i.e. "let's use chemicals at the highest limit that is legal and/or at a level we don't think it will be detected"

But ultimately it all came crashing down.

Nike I'm sure want the $ sales - so turned a blind eye as long as their product was associated with winning athletes … now it's bitten them in the ass big time.

I had just about forgotten Nike's involvement with Lance Armstrong - now another association with PED - not what I think the Nike brand managers would be wanting.  Even so they are standing by Salazar pending any appeals.  I wonder sometimes whether the sponsorship money might be better spent on supporting grass roots sport rather than having the reputation risk of associating with high profile athletes and coaches.

#12 Davo

    1000-club gold-rated CoolRunner

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,166 posts
  • Joined: 03-September 02
  • Sex:Male
  • Location:Launceston, Tasmania

Posted 04 October 2019 - 09:46 PM

View PostSkyChariot, on 04 October 2019 - 04:09 PM, said:

^^^JXT, some people actually dont know what a marathon is. They think the city to surf is a marathon, or i have even heard people say they ran a 10k marathon. AFL players run around 15ks to 16ks in the course of a match, and we know thats not a marathon, but some people have no idea. On this drug thing. Shame on them. Anyone who deliberately takes something to enhance their performance is a disgrace, and they deserve to be wiped right out of sport. At the end of the day, if you do all the training, and perform to the best of your ability, thats what matters, not cheating and winning medals, as, you will always be remembered for that, and you not only tarnish yourself, but it reflects on your country. Any coach that expects their players to take stuff to make not only their charges perform better, but make them look good as coaches, is even worse.

I think you need to qualify this, SC. I can see quite clearly what you are saying and I totally agree with you, but you have  missed out one very important word. For example, I have a good strong cup of coffee and take a vig tablet before my 5k park run, and most other runners do similar things. The point is, that although those actions are performance enhancing, they are quite legal.
It's when you take illegal stuff that the problems start.
Eating properly, getting enough rest, and even going out training can all be defined as "performance-enhancing activities."

#13 riffraff

    1000-club gold-rated CoolRunner

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,623 posts
  • Joined: 27-April 09
  • Sex:Male
  • Location:Sydney

Posted 05 October 2019 - 06:04 AM

^ harsh.

That sort of pedantry would give Bellthorpe a run for his money.

#14 speedmeup

    veryCoolRunner

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 898 posts
  • Joined: 02-January 12
  • Sex:Male
  • Location:Ballina

Posted 05 October 2019 - 10:58 AM

View PostDavo, on 04 October 2019 - 09:46 PM, said:

View PostSkyChariot, on 04 October 2019 - 04:09 PM, said:

^^^JXT, some people actually dont know what a marathon is. They think the city to surf is a marathon, or i have even heard people say they ran a 10k marathon. AFL players run around 15ks to 16ks in the course of a match, and we know thats not a marathon, but some people have no idea. On this drug thing. Shame on them. Anyone who deliberately takes something to enhance their performance is a disgrace, and they deserve to be wiped right out of sport. At the end of the day, if you do all the training, and perform to the best of your ability, thats what matters, not cheating and winning medals, as, you will always be remembered for that, and you not only tarnish yourself, but it reflects on your country. Any coach that expects their players to take stuff to make not only their charges perform better, but make them look good as coaches, is even worse.

I think you need to qualify this, SC. I can see quite clearly what you are saying and I totally agree with you, but you have  missed out one very important word. For example, I have a good strong cup of coffee and take a vig tablet before my 5k park run, and most other runners do similar things. The point is, that although those actions are performance enhancing, they are quite legal.
It's when you take illegal stuff that the problems start.
Eating properly, getting enough rest, and even going out training can all be defined as "performance-enhancing activities."

Not quite.. it's the levels that are concerning in most cases, not the substance itself.
I.e testosterone and cae ffeine are completely legal chemicals to have in your body - it's when the levels exceed a reasonable limit that it is deemed to be sanctioned. That's where Salazar/Nike played with the boundaries and got busted trying to run too close to the wind (excuse the pun).

#15 SkyChariot

    1000-club gold-rated CoolRunner

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,842 posts
  • Joined: 10-November 11
  • Sex:Female
  • Location:corrimal

Posted 05 October 2019 - 11:14 AM

^^i don't think, Davo, that eating properly, getting enough rest, and going out training can be classed as performance enhancing. Its just what humans are meant to do to live their best healthy lives. They werent designed to take illegal chemicals to try and be better than nature ever intended. We know the dire consequences on the body of doing such things. Its a bit like trying to put rocket fuel into your ordinary car to make it into something the manufacturers never intended it to be. You wont get very far.

#16 Davo

    1000-club gold-rated CoolRunner

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,166 posts
  • Joined: 03-September 02
  • Sex:Male
  • Location:Launceston, Tasmania

Posted 05 October 2019 - 12:54 PM

Agree with the above two posts.
Pedantry can get one into a lot of trouble.
SC, I love you dearly and would do anything for you (except feed you illegal drugs) :give_rose:

#17 dadagain

    1000-club gold-rated CoolRunner

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,914 posts
  • Joined: 22-October 13
  • Sex:Male
  • Location:Brisbane

Posted 06 October 2019 - 07:44 AM

Interesting topic.

I’ve struggled with the ethics of performance enhancing drug bans for a while.

I realise there are 2 possible reasons for prohibition:
1] Pursuit of the elusive “level playing field”
2] Discouraging unhealthy behaviours

1] is clearly fantasy - there is no such thing. It’s cleary obvious that some people have far more advantages than others, genetic, economic, geographic etc etc. I was very unimpressed that Caster Semenya was banned from competing because of her natural advantage over others but the logic once again was “unfair advantage”. Will we see Basketballers all made to comply with a maximum height criteria? What other advantages are we going to deem “unfair”? Some athletes have access to 1st class facilities, sports science, phyios, etc etc...  others work a full time job to keep themselves going. Should we return to the days of amateurism in the name of the level playing field?

2] Elite sport is dangerous. To be able to perform at the highest level means doing things that are unhealthy. It means training at the exclusion of all else it means obsessive focus way beyond a point that most people would consider safe. Diets are controlled and managed to the nth degree and “normal healthy life” sacrificed in the pursuit of excellence. Surely the line between carefully controlled diets and supplements and “illegal drug use” is an arbitrary one?

As for me - I have a variety of drugs my doctor gives me to manage a number of complex conditions. I am unsure to be honest if my treatments are consistent with WADA guidelines and to be honest I’m not bothered. My motivation for treatment is improved health and I’m not in any danger of becoming a winning elite athlete any time soon. If WADA started random checking of the masses at big city marathons then it’s possible I could fall foul of the letter of the law. Does that make me a cheat? Or does that make the rules inappropriate?


All that being said - from what I’ve read Salazar seems to have very much breeched the spirit of fair and reasonable competition and I can understand why he’s getting negative attention as a result.

It’s an interesting topic and I don’t see any sport really getting a handle on it any time soon!

#18 speedmeup

    veryCoolRunner

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 898 posts
  • Joined: 02-January 12
  • Sex:Male
  • Location:Ballina

Posted 06 October 2019 - 04:12 PM

It would be interesting to see all athletes quarantined for 12 weeks prior to a meet in the same facility. Restricted to the same training facilities and dietary options. Then we might see who is the most talented.

#19 Stej

    1000-club gold-rated CoolRunner

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,063 posts
  • Joined: 06-January 08
  • Sex:Male
  • Location:Melbourne

Posted 07 October 2019 - 02:34 PM

View Postdadagain, on 06 October 2019 - 07:44 AM, said:

All that being said - from what I've read Salazar seems to have very much breeched the spirit of fair and reasonable competition and I can understand why he's getting negative attention as a result.

Yeah, the degree of "boundary pushing" did seem on the aggressive end of the scale.  I think a lot of the elite level supplementation and various interventions would not pass the "pub test" for reasonable competition (not, of course, that this is the actual standard).  I read an article where one journalist said he thought that maybe one application of testosterone gel would have been ok where the NOP people applied too many times or too much.  The fact that this implied that applying any testosterone gel was fair and reasonable made be LOL.  

View Postspeedmeup, on 06 October 2019 - 04:12 PM, said:

It would be interesting to see all athletes quarantined for 12 weeks prior to a meet in the same facility. Restricted to the same training facilities and dietary options. Then we might see who is the most talented.

In a similar vein, it would be interesting to see a motorsport race with all drivers having the same car.

#20 speedmeup

    veryCoolRunner

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 898 posts
  • Joined: 02-January 12
  • Sex:Male
  • Location:Ballina

Posted 10 October 2019 - 04:34 PM

A variety of cars are better, but they should all get the same fuel and number of practice laps. No fair if one car gets rocket fuel and 1000 practice laps, and the other car gets unleaded and 1 sighting lap.

#21 Jindalee

    veryCoolRunner

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 537 posts
  • Joined: 19-June 14
  • Sex:Female
  • Location:Sydney

Posted 11 October 2019 - 06:59 PM

Nike Oregon project is shutting down as a result of this

https://www.bbc.co.u...letics/50011044

#22 SkyChariot

    1000-club gold-rated CoolRunner

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,842 posts
  • Joined: 10-November 11
  • Sex:Female
  • Location:corrimal

Posted 12 October 2019 - 11:03 AM

dadagain, just had a proper read of your post up above. Interesting points, but there are always plenty of ways to look at these things.  You ended up with medical conditions that made you less than what you were before you got them. You were prescribed drugs that help you manage those conditions so that you can  function more like what you were before you got them. I dont see that as drugs giving you an advantage, and i dont see that as cheating.   What you said about there is not really such a thing as a level playing field anyway, well, thats just how humans have evolved. It was survival of the fittest.No two humans are the same, and that meant that there was a lot of competition to make sure only the best genes got passed on so our species would survive.   But having say, the advantage of being tall when you are a basketballer, doesnt mean that you are better than those less tall. Its how you use it to your advantage, and that includes mindset. You see plenty of gifted people in many fields that just dont go on to take advantage of the gift for many reasons. Look at Nick Kyrgios. He has so much natural talent, yet often gets flogged by those with much less talent, yet much more mind power and effort. There are plenty of people that do really well in sport that get there not because they are the most gifted, but because they have the will and desire. And look at the Kenyans as an example of not having to have all the whiz bang science and training to perform at the top level. When they really came onto the scene and started to dominate in running events, especially distance ones, they often had no fancy training, no fancy 'nutrition, no fancy science, and even no shoes! There are plenty of 'first world' people with all the advantages that cant keep up with those that dont have those type of advantages. It doesnt mean success. And it wasnt all that long ago that olympic athletes all pretty much worked, as you couldnt make a living out of doing most of those olympic sports. Look at people like our own Ron Clark. He worked, and trained after work and was one of the best there ever was. Being able to be professional and donate all your time to training doesnt guarantee success. I dont think training for elite sport full time is all that dangerous and unhealthy. Not when you put it into context with how humans lived only a few generations ago, when we were much fitter. Now training for a marathon seems like a mammoth even to a lot of people, because society is a lot lot less fit than they were once before we all had gadgets to do stuff for us all the time, and cars and the like to take us everywhere. I was reading about the 'timber getters' that worked the mountain here, back between the early 1800s and through to the 1920s. They cut down huge trees by hand, and sawed them into boards working in pits with big hand held saws. They did this for 10 hrs a day, and most of them walked between 4 and 6 miles [not ks] to work and the same home afterwoods. One guy who hauled logs with a team of 10 bullock, from the pits to the mine along the mountain, would start at 5am, and finish near dark, and walk 20 miles [not ks] each day up and down the escarpment beside his team, hauling these logs to and fro. This was just day in day out life, and these guys were fit. They lived through to their eighties. What we see as hard and extreme these days, well we coped with fine back then, as we evolved as resilient creatures. Look back to ancient civilizations, and the stuctures they built, by hand, not with machines, no one could do that these days. And going back to the Kenyans, i always find it interesting that people are trying to work out the secrets to their success. Its more than likely got a lot to do with they live very simple lives without all the crap that we have. They have to mostly get about on foot, from the time they can walk. Kids just are naturally fit, and used to traveling to and from school for quite long distances on foot, without giving it a second thought, so marathon running is a piece of piss to them. Come olympic qualifying, they always have hundred under the A qualifiers to choose from, where us advantaged countries, with all our science, nutrition, advantages struggle to get just three under the B qualifier. I think its unfortunate now that science meddles so much in our lives, and it is forgetting our roots and our humanity and turning people into measured performance robots.

Edited by SkyChariot, 12 October 2019 - 11:04 AM.


#23 riffraff

    1000-club gold-rated CoolRunner

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,623 posts
  • Joined: 27-April 09
  • Sex:Male
  • Location:Sydney

Posted 13 October 2019 - 06:39 AM

View PostSkyChariot, on 12 October 2019 - 11:03 AM, said:

And going back to the Kenyans, i always find it interesting that people are trying to work out the secrets to their success. Its more than likely got a lot to do with they live very simple lives without all the crap that we have. They have to mostly get about on foot, from the time they can walk. Kids just are naturally fit, and used to traveling to and from school for quite long distances on foot, without giving it a second thought, so marathon running is a piece of piss to them. Come olympic qualifying, they always have hundred under the A qualifiers to choose from, where us advantaged countries, with all our science, nutrition, advantages struggle to get just three under the B qualifier. I think its unfortunate now that science meddles so much in our lives, and it is forgetting our roots and our humanity and turning people into measured performance robots.

Yeah nah.

https://sports.inqui...-against-doping

#24 riffraff

    1000-club gold-rated CoolRunner

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,623 posts
  • Joined: 27-April 09
  • Sex:Male
  • Location:Sydney

Posted 14 October 2019 - 12:05 PM

Kosgei, from 2.47 a few short years ago to 2.14, lol.

Elite level athletics is a total farce.

#25 DrinksRunner

    veryCoolRunner

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 910 posts
  • Joined: 16-January 14
  • Sex:Male
  • Location:Launceston

Posted 14 October 2019 - 03:41 PM

Its funny
Kip choge runs 1:59 celebtrated

Kosgei runs 2:14 people put question marks over it.

Paula Radcliffes record was due for breaking and Kosgei has been runing well.

I watched a facebook video the other day of a 70 year old American breaking 3 hours in the marathon for the first time in his 70's then proceeded to do it 3 times in the one year and also running a unofficial 2:54   Amazing.

https://www.runnersw...-hour-marathon/

#26 riffraff

    1000-club gold-rated CoolRunner

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,623 posts
  • Joined: 27-April 09
  • Sex:Male
  • Location:Sydney

Posted 15 October 2019 - 05:54 AM

Not unhappy about the insufferable Radcliffe losing her (dodgy) record.

However the massive gains made by Kosgei in recent times are highly questionable. Wouldn't be too many elites making half hour gains. Things to consider; she's in the Rosa camp, out of comp drug testing next to non existent in Kenya.

As for the 1.59 televised laboratory experiment?  Catatonic yawn.

Edited by riffraff, 15 October 2019 - 05:55 AM.


#27 AndyP

    1000-club gold-rated CoolRunner

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,020 posts
  • Joined: 07-April 08
  • Sex:Male
  • Location:Sinnamon Park, Qld

Posted 15 October 2019 - 06:22 AM

View PostDrinksRunner, on 14 October 2019 - 03:41 PM, said:

Its funny
Kip choge runs 1:59 celebtrated
Question marks on this too.

#28 JXT

    1000-club gold-rated CoolRunner

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,547 posts
  • Joined: 13-May 10
  • Sex:Male
  • Location:Lilyfield

Posted 15 October 2019 - 03:27 PM

I think it would be naive not to be at least a bit sceptical of Kosgei’s progression, especially given the Rosa link. But I think that you can be rightfully sceptical of every marathon WR (or near WR) in the last 40 years or more. And I’m aware that that timeframe includes Deek, about whom there were plenty of rumours and speculation. Just as there is around a current Australian marathoner.

As for the Ineos 1:59 project, I cannot understand the animosity towards it. Speaking with many of the pacers before and in the days afterwards, they were absolutely buzzing to be involved. Several of them put off their own plans for Berlin and Chicago to be a part of it.
As for the public’s reaction to it, I’ve never seen such emotion and excitement at a sporting event. And anything that brings sport and, in particular, athletics, I bit of limelight can’t be a bad thing.

Also I was wrong about the odds of Kipchoge getting tested after the event. I thought they were testing 30 of the 42 total athletes, but it was 30 of the 36 who participated (six pacers were reserves). And yes, Kipchoge was among the 30 chosen.

#29 riffraff

    1000-club gold-rated CoolRunner

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,623 posts
  • Joined: 27-April 09
  • Sex:Male
  • Location:Sydney

Posted 15 October 2019 - 03:40 PM

View PostDrinksRunner, on 14 October 2019 - 03:41 PM, said:

I watched a facebook video the other day of a 70 year old American breaking 3 hours in the marathon for the first time in his 70's then proceeded to do it 3 times in the one year and also running a unofficial 2:54   Amazing.

For a moment there I thought you were referring to Frank Mezza (RIP).

He also broke big records in his age group........until photos surfaced of him riding a bike during the race.

#30 bobbys

    1000-club gold-rated CoolRunner

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,453 posts
  • Joined: 19-January 09
  • Sex:Male
  • Location:Sydney - Inner West

Posted 15 October 2019 - 03:55 PM

Interesting that Rupp and Hasay both suffered injuries during the Chicago marathon and withdrew.  2 NOP athletes fail to finish?

https://www.runnersw...XiFUJezSkAb1bhk