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Is a 10k in 45 minutes possible


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#1 iwanttobefaster

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Posted 17 October 2004 - 07:20 AM

2 weeks ago i ran a 10k in 51:40.
I would really like to get under 45 minutes. Is it too much to ask?
Am currently running 30-35 miles per week hoping to increase to 40 soon (did do 40mpw early this year) and eventually by the end of the year hope to be doing 50 miles a week.
Long run consists of 90-110 minutes
Rest of week aerobic based runs, with one fast session each week ie. tempo, fartlek, etc.

Appreciate any advice Thank you  :)

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#2 Grey beard

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Posted 17 October 2004 - 02:02 PM

Ah the elusive 45 min 10 km! I have been chasing it for 4 years and started with a time like yours. Unofficially (10 km split of a half marathon) I went under 46 mins two years ago, and 'officially' (claimed certified course) I went under 47 at the Run to the G this year. On age adjusted terms this year's effort was equivalent to 42 mins but the older I am when I get to the 45 mins the 'faster' I will need to be in age adjusted terms.
I would like to think it's all just a matter of training and racing iwanttobefaster. But of course there's also genetics. In the end it is that element of the unknown that makes it a challenge!

#3 RUN 422

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Posted 18 October 2004 - 04:21 AM

I finally got my time under 40.00 after I'd started doing 400s & 800s at the track flat out. This not only improved my speed but gave me the most important thing, confidence, knowing that I 'could' run faster.
  :D

#4 iwanttobefaster

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Posted 18 October 2004 - 04:59 AM

Thanks Guys

RUN 422 that is an impressive time.
How many 400s and 800s did you do and what  sort of recovery did you do.

And what times were you doing beforehand

Sorry so many questions?

#5 Spot

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Posted 18 October 2004 - 01:51 PM

There's a bit of work around lately that suggests that interval training at your target pace, with very short recoveries, can give good results.
In your case that would mean 1km in 4:30 then 1 minute recovery, repeat * 10.  You will need to build up to this over several weeks though - start with longer recovery time and fewer repeats.  But try to keep the pace very close to 4:30.
Good luck!
.

#6 Slacker

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Posted 18 October 2004 - 06:55 PM

I started running in April this year using the  Hal Higdon Novice 10k  program. I finished my first 10k in June in 51:59.

I then switched to his  10k Intermediate program as I wanted to improve my times. I ran a 44:18 September.

It was the interval sessions that really helped me speed up along with lengthening my "long run" for stamina.

Good luck.

#7 nvrgvup

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Posted 19 October 2004 - 02:52 AM

Depends on a few things i guess: How old you are, how long u've been running, genetics and stuff like that. But big improvements can be made with a good mental attitude. Good luck with it

#8 MONO

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Posted 07 November 2004 - 03:38 PM

Im in your boat iwanttobefaster.

I run a 10K in around 50 min - now looking for 45 min. Im going to start a program that i found at http://www.time-to-r...g/10k/sub45.htm

interseting to read the good results from Repo Man - may swith to that program if i dont get any joy from current program.

cheers

#9 knight60

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Posted 07 November 2004 - 06:49 PM

iwanttobefaster

I used Ben Wisbey's 4-day a week program (in Runners World mag about 18 months ago) to increase my times. Here's a lnk: http://www.endurance.....0Day Week.pdf

I was running about 50-60 km p/w at the time, but dropped down to about 35-40. For about 10 weeks I used Ben's program, consisting of 1 x interval session, 1 x long run, 1 x tempo run and 1 x recovery run. I knocked 2 mins off my 5 km time, 4 mins off my 8km time, and 7 mins off my 14 km time when I ran 4 races in 8 days at the Trans Tasman Masters Games last year. I was blown away by the improved times that I would not have believed possible. I would avoid doing a huge weekly mileage and focus on more specificity. Sure worked for me.  ;)

#10 iwanttobefaster

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Posted 08 November 2004 - 09:19 AM

Just an update

Did my 10k today a relatively flat traffic free course. A fairly cool day around 14 degrees.
But not cold.
Managed it in 52:23 not a pb, though i would of been expecting too much for another pb after just 3 weeks of speedwork.
Anyway i'm being optomistic. Soon be planning races for next year and which to target, then to plan my schedule.
I'll be back  ;)

#11 iwanttobefaster

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Posted 20 November 2004 - 10:34 AM

Hi

Have entered another 10k
Didn't think it would be run this year but it is now  :D  
December 19th. Am currently in my 2nd week building my base before starting the faster stuff early next year, so will be interesting to see how far it will take me

#12 shane hayes

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Posted 21 November 2004 - 05:46 PM

O.K.
Yes you should be already under 45min based on the amount of training you are doing, you should check to make sure you are not overtraining, it is quiet simple to get below 45min everyone in the world has potential to do it unless you are 80-100 years old or under 10. It is just a matter of patience and commitement, at that level i don't think you really need any speed or interval work, just do regular 5-10km races and you will get quickier, because at 45min 10km pace you don't need speed because you only have to do 1;48 for 400m now you should be able to do that quite easy because that would mean you would get lapped in a 400m race (when they do warm down after race). Look all i did to get under 45min was regular 10km races at least once a month and 3-4x a week doing 10km runs so only 30km a week, and i got to low 40min within a year of running, the hard part is sub 40min which requires correct training technique like speed work and base ect.., look i did not start training until this year and was running 36:07 with speed training i got it down to 34:39 for 10km in 3months but then injured myself and now only run 41min or so, so will never do speed again will stick to just running i improve anoth that way, the main reason people like speed work (intervals) is you improve alot faster but will not be able to sustain for long and will injure yourself and go backwards where as just jogging(base) will allow you to slowly improve without ever worrying about injury as long as you have patience.
So you choose run sub 45min in couple of months and then end up back where you are now or run sub 40min in a couple of years.

#13 nvrgvup

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Posted 21 November 2004 - 08:56 PM

The thing I have found with shorter races like 5km and 10km is that you don't have to run an abundance of miles to be successful at them. As spot said training at your goal race pace is a good stratergy and the reason of that is you are training your body to run at that pace (specificity). But of course this can't be done everyday because you need to let your body recover from those harder sessions so that your body can get benefit from them. Depending on the course you are racing on, it could be useful to include a hill session every fortnight or so, because hill training gives you good strength in your quads and glutes and will allow you to run faster up a hill in a race than without hill training. Also as Shane Hayes said races at 5km-10km races will make you faster because a race is the best form of training, one every month or so can benfit your training significantly. The main thing with your running is that you enjoy it, because if you dont enjoy it what's the point?


nvrgvup

#14 Sarge

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Posted 21 November 2004 - 10:33 PM

You are evolving. You have been bitten by the running bug and it take stime to get over the first flush of enthusiasim and work out how to train and plan. I started three years ago and ran a ten k at 47  mins. This year I ran it in 40 mins. The difference has been time which has given me a base and the coming to terms with the fact that just running ten k's every day doesn't work. I needed to actually train. Which meant warming up and doing just hills, or intervals, or fartlek or a time trial.Followed by a day of easy paced running(very important!) At first it felt like I hadn't done much because there are times during these training periods that are spent recovering as opposed to running ten k's straight out. The difference is the intensity and that I am training my body to be tougher. You have to make this decision yourself and be disciplined. No short cuts and no bludging. You will do it and then go on to even lower times. Good luck.   :P

#15 iwanttobefaster

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Posted 22 November 2004 - 11:08 PM

Thanks Guys

Initially this next race wasn't going to be running (4 weeks to go) so i was thinking about races next year so after the last race i'd planned to go back to base, build my mileage up again before adding the faster stuff next year.
Looking forward to this now.
It's nice to know you have faith in me  :)  even though you don't know me.
Will keep you posted

Around here although its not particularly hilly, there are undulations (3-5% gradients, even 8%) so can't avoid them.But can get to places with steeper hills longer too though there is one ┬╝mile long down the road.

#16 AxPaSv

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Posted 23 November 2004 - 03:50 PM

This is the training I do with mates for the longer stuff, like 8k and 10k:
Repetitions of hills (make hills your strength, not your weakness)... so find a decent hill, preferably grassy, and do fast reps up that with a jog down recovery... say begin with 2-3 reps and build it up to 6-8.
Speed work, like Fartlek around a track as well as shortcourse time trials (1.5k and 3k).
Longer runs.

This is my program during Cross Country Season:
Sunday: 60 minute run, easy to threshold pace (threshold = just under race pace for the distance you're targeting, so you're starting slow and building it up over the 60 minutes)
Monday: Shortcourse time trial, 1k, 1.5k or 3k
Tuesday: Hill repetitions (8 of them, but I start with less than 4)
Wednesday: 30 minute very easy run
Thursday: Fartlek around a grass or synthetic track (5 mins on, 5 mins off, 4 mins on, 4 mins off etc. down to 1)
Friday: rest
Saturday: competition

I also sometimes do sessions of extreme speed, like 4 reps of 400m in sub-63 with 2 minutes recovery.

My 10k pb currently stands at 36:01

BUT!!! One thing I have to absolutely stress is this: build into a training program like the one above very slowly, letting your body adjust to the extra load. Try to peak around the 4th-5th week.